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#1
So, can perfect pitch be learned? It seems to be a wonderful ability to have as a musician. I didn't find any helpful methods for training perfect pitch so if anyone has one, I would love to know.
#2
Not that i know of. You may train your ear to a great point but i think that's something that comes with birth.
Let's go back to five billion bpm and see how good i am.
#3
most people are very lucky to be born with it,
but there is no harm in practicing it
what u can do is a lot of interval training

where someone is playing an instrument plays the root then an interval and u practice

but then after that im not sure which way to go to make it harder lol
#4
if you play the guitar for a long time consistently you'll notice when you're in pitch or not
#6
Quote by 100Roy001
So, can perfect pitch be learned? It seems to be a wonderful ability to have as a musician. I didn't find any helpful methods for training perfect pitch so if anyone has one, I would love to know.


I think it can.

If you master relative pitch is quite easy as i found out myself.

For example if i listened to a song very often, i could -before the song started- sing the
exact tune (notes). If you then take the root, lets say C, you'll always have the C in
your mind and you can name the other notes too. It's quite easy to learn one note, or a couple of notes to start from to find out other notes.
#7
Can you really be born with it? I thought it has to be learned but you have to start at a very young age.
Btw practising intervals will give you relative pitch, while perfect pitch is the ability to recognize single pitches e.g. "that's a G and that's a C"
#8
After playing for some time, I now see that I can almost always correctly play a note I heard in my mind or somewhere else. Interesting thing is, that I can do that on piano, which I bought only yesterday. So perfect pitch can be learned eventually, I think, it just takes much time and work with interval comparison.
#9
It can definately be learned, some are indeed born with it (it seems), such as my keyboard player who is 15 and can pick out the pitch of a car horn. But I know plenty of people who learned it over time (my vocal coach, guitar teacher and so on), and I myself am starting to recognize certain notes when I hear them, aswell as remember what key songs are in after hours of not hearing them, but I can tell if I'm playing it in the wrong key. And I was the most unmusical baby ever.

So yeah, ear training and playing (while paying good attention to what you're doing) is what it's all about. It will probably take you a good amount of years to really get good at it though.
#10
I think it can be learned. In my opinion, perfect pitch isn't a natural talent, it's just a very good musical memory, which you may or may not be born with, but can develop and train just like any other skill. I've just finished my first year at college doing music as one of my subjects, and I find that I can pitch certain notes very well or near enough perfect in my head.
There are other things that can help aswell. Like someone above me said, knowing a song very well can help you pitch certain notes (as long as you know what those notes are). In summary, it's all about practice.
#12
Seeing as guitar is so interval-dependent I don't really see the point in learning perfect pitch except as a good trick. I find it easy enough to match a pitch in my head to the fretboard and then I'll find out which note it is.
#13
dont find that true at all attack, but hey i must of been born with it then lol

But also attack very good article and it is making sense the more i read lol good find
Last edited by Martindecorum at Jul 27, 2008,
#15
Quote by :-D
You fail. I developed perfect pitch at the age of 16.


He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#17
I'm pretty sure Steve Vai and Joe Satriani weren't born with it but they trained their ears until got it.

So I guess it can be learned. Some are born with such a musical ear, others have to train it.
Last edited by niqolaise at Jul 27, 2008,
#18
Quote by :-D
You fail. I developed perfect pitch at the age of 16.


Proof?
Let's go back to five billion bpm and see how good i am.
#19
Quote by Attack
Proof?

I don't know how to prove this to you over the Internet exactly, but there's another UG member that I go to school with who can attest to this fact if you'd like.
#20
Quote by :-D
I don't know how to prove this to you over the Internet exactly, but there's another UG member that I go to school with who can attest to this fact if you'd like.


Ok i might believe you. If that is the case i always wondered what note and frequency various car horns were. Care to tell?

Man if you really can without making them up, then i declare you the new Eric Johnson.
Let's go back to five billion bpm and see how good i am.
Last edited by Attack at Jul 27, 2008,
#21
Quote by Attack
Ok i might believe you. If that is the case i always wondered what note and frequency various car horns were. Care to tell?

Man if you really can without making them up, then i declare you the new Eric Johnson.

Most car horns I've heard have been minor thirds, a lot of the honking I heard at school consisted of G#-B, but there were of course some variations on that.

And if you've heard my playing, you would not tell me I'm EJ.
#22
Quote by :-D
Most car horns I've heard have been minor thirds, a lot of the honking I heard at school consisted of G#-B, but there were of course some variations on that.

And if you've heard my playing, you would not tell me I'm EJ.




You are correct. But don't be so happy right now. When scientists find out, they will kidnap you and make experiments with your ear. Now go tab me some songs.
Let's go back to five billion bpm and see how good i am.
#23
Quote by Attack


You are correct. But don't be so happy right now. When scientists find out, they will kidnap you and make experiments with your ear. Now go tab me some songs.





I actually need to start transcribing more music anyway.
#24
The best thing you could do is get a good relative pitch down. Then you could get a piano or something you know is in tune and work on hearing the difference of each individual note. Like colors being different wavelengths, notes have different frequencies and are different for that reason.


One last thing: Please use the searchbar. This thread has come up a million times. It always ends up with people arguing that you have to be born with perfect pitch against people saying you can learn it.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#25
Quote by :-D




I actually need to start transcribing more music anyway.



Well, if that's true, please tell me how you learned it. Or is it just by experience?

(Oh, and I used the searchbar.)
#26
Quote by 100Roy001
(Oh, and I used the searchbar.)

Srsly?

“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#27
Quote by metal4all
Srsly?


Well, I searched for 'perfect pitch' and I got nothing relevant.

EDIT: Oh I get it. Search in thread titles. Please forgive me!
#28
Eh,
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#29
Quote by niqolaise
I'm pretty sure Steve Vai and Joe Satriani weren't born with it but they trained their ears until got it.

So I guess it can be learned. Some are born with such a musical ear, others have to train it.

I'm pretty sure that neither of them have perfect pitch. Relkative pitch, very good at that, but not perfect pitch.
Originally posted by WlCmToTheJungle "you have just received the amish computer virus. Since the amish dont have computers it's based on there honor system so please delete all of your files immediatly. thank you
#30
The answer is YES-kind of. David Lucas Burge's 'Supercourse' sounds like complete crap, but I'm 3/4 of the way through it and I can recognise any note played on my piano or clean guitar. Its kind of vague with other or effected instruments, but you should torrent the course and try it.

The only problem with it is that DLB has an incredibly annoying voice and spends the first two lessons explaining why perfect pitch is good, and why relative pitch is also good so you should buy his relative pitch course.
#31
Quote by Myung-trucci
The only problem with it is that DLB has an incredibly annoying voice and spends the first two lessons explaining why perfect pitch is good, and why relative pitch is also good so you should buy his relative pitch course.


He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#32
I don't see why it can't be learned. Unless you're truly tone deaf - not as in bad singer tone deaf but physically unable to distinguish one tone from another.

This is why I think it can be learned.

Without your instrument or anything else could you recall and hear in your mind the first note from Stairway to Heaven? Or the high B in the Nothing Else Matters intro?

If someone were to play a note would you be able to determine whether it is the same note? Can you hear in your mind the octaves of this same note?

I think many musicians who don't have "Perfect Pitch" would be able to answer yes to these questions.

From there it is not hard to imagine using the right techniques and putting in some time and effort to building a catalogue of tones that can be instantly recalled and/or recognized.
Si
#34
I always thought perfect pitch meant somebody throwing a banjo underneath a moving city bus!
#36
Quote by Myung-trucci
The answer is YES-kind of. David Lucas Burge's 'Supercourse' sounds like complete crap, but I'm 3/4 of the way through it and I can recognise any note played on my piano or clean guitar. Its kind of vague with other or effected instruments, but you should torrent the course and try it.

The only problem with it is that DLB has an incredibly annoying voice and spends the first two lessons explaining why perfect pitch is good, and why relative pitch is also good so you should buy his relative pitch course.


I torrented the course and I listened to the first track on disc 1 and he keeps saying that perfect pitch is awesome but he didn't tell me something I didn't know. Is it worth it in the end to listen to all that bull****?
#37
I torrented the course and I listened to the first track on disc 1 and he keeps saying that perfect pitch is awesome but he didn't tell me something I didn't know. Is it worth it in the end to listen to all that bull****?


Yes it is, ive also got it not very far through but i can see a difference miss the first 2 and go onto disk 2 if you cant be bothered, also at the start some of the excerises are stupid, just do them it does somehow work.
#38
Quote by Attack
No actually research has shown that it can be only learned at ages between 1-5. After that whatever you do you fail. Sorry guys.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfect_pitch


Never cite wikipedia as fact. Especially when it uses phrases like "quite good" in the article...

Perfect pitch can be learned, as someone stated earlier, Vai learned it later on in his life, some other musicians do the same thing. There's no rule that states it cannot be an acquired talent.

What you do find is that many people that learn the skill will lose it fairly quickly if they don't utilize it often. Not to say it cannot be regained, but someone with "natural" perfect pitch should never lose their skills.

The real question you have to ask yourself is, will it really help you as a musician?
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#39
mwuahahha i am cursed, i have relative/perfect pitch with Eb transposing instruments (saxophone alto =D) so when i hear a note my brain automatically makes it a minor 3rd above then what it really is, kinda complicated and irritating playing an Eb sax and a C guitar
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#40
Unfortunately, I don't think it can be learned, if someone played a G and said hey what note is this... Would you be able to tell by just listening? if so, then your a lucky bastard....

I think only relative pitch can be learned, but hey thats good enough
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