#1
I've been playing for about 9 months, and I'm just curious if you should learn all the patterns of a scale. It just seems like a lot of memorizing to me ...
#2
just start off learning major and minor and then experiment with them and try to get a full understanding on how they work than go on to learning more
"Men profess to be lovers of music, but for the most part they give no evidence in their opinions and lives that they have heard it." ~Henry David Thoreau
#3
no don't waste your time learning patterns, LEARN THE THEORY of contructing scales and where the notes of the chromatic scale are located, this way you can make up your own patterns of how and where to play the scale
#4
Quote by dxtreme
no don't waste your time learning patterns, LEARN THE THEORY of contructing scales and where the notes of the chromatic scale are located, this way you can make up your own patterns of how and where to play the scale

Agreed.
#5
Quote by Slashed_Tire
Agreed.



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#6
Patterns are useless unless you know how to construct them in your own original songs. Jamming them out is also a solid next step. But, learning the theory behind what you are playing is probably more effecient; try doing both.
#7
thanks, do you know any websites or books that i can use to help me with learning that theory
#8
yes here tell me what scales you wanna learn?

ill start you off with this
major : 1-2-3-4-5-6-7
major penta : 1-2-3-5-6
minor penta : 1-b3-4-5-b7

to use these this is what you do

lets say you wanna play in key of C in a major scale ionian mode

c (1,2,3,4,5,6,7)
c,d,e,f,g,a,b
#9
There is a great theory lesson on this site, it's about 20 pages of gold.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

There you go, as you try and read it, make sure you are understanding what you are reading.
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Last edited by Mudhippy2011 at Jul 27, 2008,
#10
oh and you don't need a ton of theory just basic theory would be good i suggest learning your intervals within the ONE OCTAVE range that should be good enough and then learn some of the scales you like i like scales that have a jazzy feel so i use jazz melodic minor, lydian, and minor pentatonic in keys of d,e,a but keep in mind i've only been playing guitar for two months so take my advice with a grain of salt. but i also play piano and drums. ALSO MAKE SURE YOU LEARN THE NOTES ON THE NECK!
#11
Quote by Mudhippy2011
There is a great theory lesson on this site, it's about 20 pages of gold.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

There you go, as you try and read it, make sure you are understanding what you are reading.


wow thanks for that.
Thomas hopes to not have offended anyone with this post. No responsibility whatsoever is taken for any spelling or grammar mistakes, should there be any.

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#12
Alright thanks guys, i already know the notes of the neck, but i cant tell what it is from the top of my head ... i have to say the alphabet ... also, that article is really useful ... thanks

So basically I shouldn't learn a lot of scales ? Or is it more important to learn one or two scales and understand them.
#13
Idealy you should learn all the scales and their theory, but the best thing for you to do, from personal experience as a teacher and such, is this; make sure you can actually solo in those scales, modes and keys that you have learned. Learn the few that are imperative; major - three position and in three keys; minor - the same again; pentatonic - both manjor and minor; and finally the melodic minor scale in three keys and three positions.
If you can comfortably solo in any of those, you are your way to becoming very adept.
#15
Quote by AngryGoldfish
Idealy you should learn all the scales and their theory, but the best thing for you to do, from personal experience as a teacher and such, is this; make sure you can actually solo in those scales, modes and keys that you have learned. Learn the few that are imperative; major - three position and in three keys; minor - the same again; pentatonic - both manjor and minor; and finally the melodic minor scale in three keys and three positions.
If you can comfortably solo in any of those, you are your way to becoming very adept.


when you mean solo, do you mean improvising ?
#16
Quote by DGen92
OMG i just read that, and I barely understand it.


It's complicated. Take it a paragraph at a time and study it until it clicks, then move on. On a few occasions I spent up to 4 hours to comprehend a single paragraph... but it was either pay attention in school or study theory
#17
Quote by Jeremy Clark
It's complicated. Take it a paragraph at a time and study it until it clicks, then move on. On a few occasions I spent up to 4 hours to comprehend a single paragraph... but it was either pay attention in school or study theory


yeah im probably gonna print it out and read it during class when school starts
#18
Quote by DGen92
when you mean solo, do you mean improvising ?


Yes I do mean when improvising. Learning other peoples solos do not require you to learn scales as the tabs are already there, and all you need to do is learn the patterns. Unless you are tabbing the song yourself, then you will need to know the scales and theory behind it so you can recognize what the artist is playing.
#19
Quote by AngryGoldfish
Yes I do mean when improvising. Learning other peoples solos do not require you to learn scales as the tabs are already there, and all you need to do is learn the patterns. Unless you are tabbing the song yourself, then you will need to know the scales and theory behind it so you can recognize what the artist is playing.


So if i need to transcribe/tab then ill need to know the scales and theory ? And will learning scales help you learn solos from tabs as well ?
#20
Quote by DGen92
So if i need to transcribe/tab then ill need to know the scales and theory ? And will learning scales help you learn solos from tabs as well ?
To transcribe music, you don't need to know a lick of theory except for how to write music.
#21
Theory is pretty closely linked with knowing how to read music though; your splitting hairs in a way. But seeing as its coming from you - you've proved many a person wrong - then your probably right.
#22
What if you learn the theory, know how to make them, and find the patterns on your own? I found the patterns, and then just used those.
#23
Quote by AngryGoldfish
Theory is pretty closely linked with knowing how to read music though; your splitting hairs in a way. But seeing as its coming from you - you've proved many a person wrong - then your probably right.

She's not splitting hairs, they're entirely different concepts. Theory is simply a descriptive tool for explaining why things sound a specific way, and music reading ability is exactly what it sounds like; the ability to read music.

You don't have to have knowledge of one to do the other.