#1
Where can i learn how to compose music?

I know very little about this subject and small bits of theory. Any good sites to learn
from the basics to advanced music composition (in general or any particular genre)?

Any good books/dvds etc recommended?

Thanks in advance, any help much appreciated.

I know this site has heaps of stuff, obviously, looking for other sources.
Last edited by .esp.rock. at Jul 27, 2008,
#2
i learned everything here but all the music writing ability i have is from listening to music and throwing ideas around with friends/band i know this probally won't help but w/e
#3
^^^Thanks for the input,
Yeah I might try analyzing songs and sounds I like and how they're made. And also ask some of my guitarist friends about this topic.
#4
Learning more theory would be a good start. The way some composers write music is to imagine something in their heads and then write it down. This takes a lot of skill and work so don't expect to be able to do that just off the top of your head. Brush up on theory and ear training and once you get good enough then you can take a shot at composition.

As for getting around writer's block, listen to music by people you've never listened to before.
#5
Alrighty, looks like after all school work is finished theres gonna be a huge amount of theory study. Once that's done it'll all be good as I listen to enough variety of music (classical, classic rock, reggae, death metal/black metal, instrumental, prog etc) to have fresh thoughts, I just need a way to get them to paper.
#6
Quote by .esp.rock.
I just need a way to get them to paper.


Work on ear training a lot.
#7
My two favorite books on the topic are Fux's Gradus Ad Parnassum for the rudiments of counterpoint and Schoenberg's Fundamentals of Musical Composition for insights on form and motivic development. Also, it is worth noting that books only serve properly as guides and that if one wants to learn to compose not only well, but with absolute artistic control, that they would have to "practice" composition by isolating ideas and developing them. (The beginning of the Schoenberg book goes over this in depth)

And here is a heads up, your first compositions will not be masterworks, in fact, you will have a lot of trouble even getting anything you like remotely out on paper.
#8
Quote by Erc
My two favorite books on the topic are Fux's Gradus Ad Parnassum for the rudiments of counterpoint and Schoenberg's Fundamentals of Musical Composition for insights on form and motivic development. Also, it is worth noting that books only serve properly as guides and that if one wants to learn to compose not only well, but with absolute artistic control, that they would have to "practice" composition by isolating ideas and developing them. (The beginning of the Schoenberg book goes over this in depth)

And here is a heads up, your first compositions will not be masterworks, in fact, you will have a lot of trouble even getting anything you like remotely out on paper.

I almost got an erection reading that for some reason. It sounds really advanced. I probably wouldn't understand a word. I'm in the same boat as the TS though so i'm gonna look for a download *cough* i mean a store online that sells them for free *cough* i mean gives royalties to the rightful creators.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
I'll second Erc's recommendation on books; complicated as they may sound, the real key is putting the ideas into some form of real application.
Quote by metal4all
I almost got an erection reading that for some reason.



*leaves*
#10
Those books are good I'd also reccomend them, hell I just read the first page of one and learned that theres such a thing as perfect and imperfect consonances.
#11
Quote by _paradox_
Those books are good I'd also reccomend them, hell I just read the first page of one and learned that theres such a thing as perfect and imperfect consonances.

Perfect Consonance: P5, P8
Imperfect Consonance: M3, m3, M6, m6
Variable Consonance: P4

Other intervals are dissonant.


I learned that from: http://www.amazon.com/Jazzology-Encyclopedia-Jazz-Theory-Musicians/dp/0634086782/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1196628814&sr=1-1

Just the little excerpt you can look at from the site shows you that. I want to buy the book.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥