#1
During the last few weeks, I've been really getting into theory, and I'm determined to learn absolutely as much as possible now.

But I'm kind of stuck when it comes to learning to write stuff that I want to write. Technically, there is no problem with my playing, I can play a good few Necrophagist-riffs and stuff, and I can sweep more and more decently. It's the theory behind all of this that is stopping me.

I need some kind of list of everything I need to learn, and how and where I can learn it. I've seen other people ask this question, and they've only been getting the answer "just learn the harmonic minor and diminished scales and you'll be fine", well, I have learned those scales and a lot of others, but I ain't getting any further. I want to learn how to make interesting chord progressions utilizing a lot of dissonance, with tritones and everything. And yes, I know what a tritone is. I know a lot of stuff, but simply not how to put it all together.

Fine, I know how to make a standard 3 chord I IV V-progression, but I can't see how I'm going to put that kind of knowledge into making technical/progressive metal.

There aren't really many lessons out there that I've found, that emphasis on the writing of this specific genre, at least not here on UG. I fully and completely realize that making music on Mr. Scuimez's level is going to take me a long time to learn, if it's ever going to happen, but I'm determined to go through lots of listening and learning here.

Any help is greatly appreciated!
#2
Listen to the bands that make up the genre not just necro. Here: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=920076
there is a good list of bands to draw Ideas from
I decided I want to be more like the people on ug...


Searchbar!!!

That oughta do it.

Time for a supercool guitar demonstration by herman li,

Herman Li- why is this guitar so big?

Stage guy- because its a bass herman

#3
Theory will not write music for you. Listening to music, practicing the music you enjoy, and being creative is the best thing you can do for yourself. Theory is used simply to analyze music, it does not create rhythms and progressions.

In short- practice and listen.
#4
try learning the chords of your "inspiration song" if you have one or a song that really likes you in the genre and mix them with the new chords, is not bad starting with similar chords as the songs of other people, with the time you will make your own style but you have to start with something.