#1
So, i've started delving into theory and i'm getting it, except for which modal scale over which chord.

ex. EMaj chord ...i know i can play an E Ionian mode obviously, but how do i know if a B Phrygian would work or if i could play an A Lydian??

AND... how do i know which ones naturally lead into one another?

how do i know if i can switch...or when i should switch from one mode to another?
#3
That depends greatly of the chord progression you are playing over. A simple way to see it, but not the correct, is that if you use a mode having the same notes as the chord is playing, then it should sound "right", but not necessarily "good".

For more details, check out these video lesson of Dave Weiner.

http://www.youtube.com/user/riffoftheweek

There are various lessons explaining how the modes work.
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#4
Over an E chord, you use an E mode, not a B or F or G#. E Ionian, E Lydian, and E Mixolydian would be the common choices, but you can't play F# Dorian, G# Phrygian, or C# Locrian. The mode is defined by the chord(s) beneath, not the position, pattern, or box, as those are unique to the guitar and do not relate to other instruments.
#5
Quote by 6stringxsamurai


how do i know if i can switch...or when i should switch from one mode to another?


Find modes that sound similar. For example, E Ionian and E Lydian only have one note difference. Do you know which one that is? Name the note and interval - just a little test for you.
#6
Quote by mdc
Find modes that sound similar. For example, E Ionian and E Lydian only have one note difference. Do you know which one that is? Name the note and interval - just a little test for you.


Sharp 4th, G# to A
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#7
Quote by Leper_Messiah_
Sharp 4th, G# to A


Yes, although I was hoping the TS would answer, just to be sure he knows what's going on. Ok, heres another one.

A Dorian, A Mixolydian. Not really much difference between these either.

Edit: ....and this one

C Lydian
C Lydian Dominant
Last edited by mdc at Jul 29, 2008,
#8
Quote by Leper_Messiah_
Sharp 4th, G# to A

Isn't the G# the third? in E
A sharp fourth would be A#

And if we were in the Key of E and decided to sharp the G# wouldn't it be called G## and not A?
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jul 29, 2008,
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
Isn't the G# the third? in E
A sharp fourth would be A#


Good spot....and here's me setting the goddam questions lol
#10
Quote by 6stringxsamurai
So, i've started delving into theory and i'm getting it, except for which modal scale over which chord.

ex. EMaj chord ...i know i can play an E Ionian mode obviously, but how do i know if a B Phrygian would work or if i could play an A Lydian??

AND... how do i know which ones naturally lead into one another?

how do i know if i can switch...or when i should switch from one mode to another?

Major modes are


Ionian, Lydian and Mixolydian.


The Minor modes are


Dorian, Phrygian, and Aeolian.


Major modes have 1 3 5, minor modes have 1 b3 5. So you can use any of the major modes in a major chord, and any of the minor in a minor chord. You can alter them and make the minor modes major, and the major modes minor, but more on that once you get these down.
#11
^^^ while that is true there are also several modes of the harmonic minor and melodic minors which also fit into the category of Major/Minor. For example A Lydian Dominant, E Phrygian Dominant, both of those could be considered major.


and MDC to answer your question (although i'm not TS, just want to test myself)

the difference between dorian and mixolydian is that dorian has a minor third while mixolydian has a major third. that's why i look at dorian as the "minor mixolydian".

and lydian dominant still has the #4 but also a b7. is that right?
#12
Quote by sisuphi
^^^ while that is true there are also several modes of the harmonic minor and melodic minors which also fit into the category of Major/Minor. For example A Lydian Dominant, E Phrygian Dominant, both of those could be considered major.


and MDC to answer your question (although i'm not TS, just want to test myself)

the difference between dorian and mixolydian is that dorian has a minor third while mixolydian has a major third. that's why i look at dorian as the "minor mixolydian".

and lydian dominant still has the #4 but also a b7. is that right?


Yes spot on. I've suddenly found that it's actually good to set random questions like this, cos it tests me as well. Again another similar pair are for example would be:

F Aeolian and F Phrygian

Edit: ....and would you know what chord type you could play over Lydian Dominant?
Last edited by mdc at Jul 29, 2008,
#13
Quote by 20Tigers
Isn't the G# the third? in E
A sharp fourth would be A#

And if we were in the Key of E and decided to sharp the G# wouldn't it be called G## and not A?

My bad
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#14
yeah. i wouldn't be able to answer any of these questions without checking my mode dictionary haha!! but I'M GETTIN' THERE DAMNIT!! I've been away from my computer for a few days otherwise i would've tried.

thanks to all of you. You guys and girls have helped me out a lot!!


but here's another Q: What makes a mode a dominant mode?
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Last edited by 6stringxsamurai at Jul 31, 2008,