#1
hey everyone its good to be back in the forums


anyways i was wondering if anyone knows anything about the ashdown dual band compressor

http://basscentre.com.au/Text/1122957672671-7876/Effects its the sixth 1 down

has anyone used 1? and if theyr not good whats another good compressor?

also i dont know much about effects so how do you use a compressor?


by the way

today my band competed in the school battle of the bands and we WON!!!!!!!

we play 'can stop by RHCP' and there were 5 other bands but we somehow pulled it off. we didnt even know we had a chance but wat do you know


sorry for the spam but i had to tell someone
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
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#2
ashdowns pedals tend to be really good, i can vouch for the chorus and hyperdrive

+ well done
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Last edited by CaptainJack666 at Jul 29, 2008,
#3
Quote by CaptainJack666
ashdowns pedals tend to be really good, i can vouch for the chorus and hyperdrive

+ well done


thanks for that but i have no idea how to use a compressor or any other effects

how would i got about using 1?
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#4
Basically, a compressor makes amplifies soft notes and quietness loud notes in order to make everything you play the same volume. The good compressor will do this without it being obvious, I haven't tried one myself, but Ashdown pedals are normally pretty good
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#5
does ok but what exactly do the knobs on the pedal control and how would i use them?

and anyone else played 1?
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#6
They are confusing to start with, compressors are the only pedal I have found where I need to read the manual
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#7
ok but when i walk into the store and plug the bass into this compressor i dont want to look like a douchebag

so like can you give me a description on the knobs and what they do?
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#8
Quote by sonsie
ok but when i walk into the store and plug the bass into this compressor i dont want to look like a douchebag

so like can you give me a description on the knobs and what they do?


I suggest sucking it up and asking for an explaination and quick demo before you start messing with it. They won't look down on you for asking.
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+1
#9
Input is how much signal comes in to to pedal
Low comp is the amount of low-frequency compression
Hi comp is pretty obvious
EQ shape looks like it would be the crossover between low and high (what frequency low ends and hi starts)
Output is how much comes out of the pedal.

I have never used this pedal, but I can give you an educated guess as to how this particular compressor works.

Compressors work when the signal reaches a certain level. A threshold is the level at which the compressor takes effect. As this pedal has no threshold knob, the threshold is probably at a set level, thus the input level will be integral in getting the signal at a level that loud notes will be above the threshold and others won't.

The 2 band part of this pedal looks like a nifty feature, as many compressors are just general. Compressing two separate frequency ranges separately can be quite an advantage, because you might play differently in different registers on the instrument.

Basically the compression knobs set the ratio at which the signal is reduced after it crosses the threshold. The higher the setting, the more compression is applied. At the 0 level, there is no compression, or a 1:1 ratio. Just for argument's sake, I will say that the midway point of the knob could be somewhere around 8:1, which means for the signal to be 1db louder than the threshold after compression, the signal would need to originally be 8db over.

Attack and release/decay are also very important for compression. Attack is the time it physically takes for the effect to kick in after crossing the threshold and release/decay is the time it takes to return to normal after the signal goes back under.

The low comp on this has slower attack/decay. This is generally a good thing for bass, as at lower frequencies the waveform takes a little longer to develop. This means if the compressor kicks in a little slower, the full attack of the note comes through before the rest of the note gets compressed. This gives a desirable punch.

The fast attack on the high compression is more appropriate as the waveforms of the notes don't need the same amount of time to develop.
#10
And continuing, there are two other important functions.

The EQ shape is a good thing because you can set exactly what is low and what is high frequency. This is handy to customize to different song keys and styles.

Output is perhaps the most important knob on the entire pedal. This can be used to compare the effect to the bypassed signal (True bypass is a great feature on this pedal). Play a few notes without the effect on, then switch it on and check if your next notes are the same volume. If not, tweak the knob until the volume levels of both positions are the same. Then you can accurately check if what the effect is doing makes you sound better.

Basically, fingerstyle should only need light compression, depending how even your technique is. It is only really there in that case to even out a few wayward notes.

Picks probably don't need compression live.

Slap should have a reasonably high ratio, but it shouldn't be noticeable that the effect is on (i.e. you can hear the pedal 'pumping' the signal). If you mix between fingers and slap, then have the input set so that only the slap is compressing.

If you need to know anything else, then just PM me.

I would suggest testing a few compressors with different functions (maybe one with attack/release knobs and a threshold) and definitely consider looking at rack compressors, as they generally have more flexibility in regards to functions.

Also ask to see the manual so you can see if they mention specs (like compression ratios, exactly what the attack/release settings are, EQ crossovers for multi-band compressors).