#1
Alright, I did a search and didn't find anything... "chords seems to bring up everything on the forums......"
I have this book and it's trying to describe how to do inverted chords, and well it doesn't do a good job of it.
So I have turned to U.G. masters to try to figure out what an Inverted chord is. Please don't pit this forum I would really like to know.

An example of what they give me for C inverted is

"Normal C"
e|----0
B|----1
G|----0
D|----2
A|----3
E|----x

"Inverted C/E"
e|----0
B|----1
G|----0
D|----2
A|----3
E|----x
See the difference.... Because I don't lol
thanks for the help in advance.
#2
It's inverted because the E in the bass of the C/E is moved to a different octave.
Quote by Altered_Carbon
That's some bony hipster sex, which may be the best kind.
#3
O.o really... but how is it moved if nothing changed in the finger positions? I guess that's what I don't get... how does it change when it shows nothing changed.
#5
Quote by WickedBeast666
O.o really... but how is it moved if nothing changed in the finger positions? I guess that's what I don't get... how does it change when it shows nothing changed.


its a different name for the same chord
#6
A C/E means that its a C chord with the E as its bass note (if I phrased that right..), rather than the C. I think in your example the low E string should be the open string..

Chord Inversions are when one of the other chord tones are played as the bass note rather than the tonic. E.g. Starting a C chord on the 3rd (Which in this case would be an E) would give you a chord inversion.
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The example is wrong. You would let the open E string ring in C/E.

Really.... well damn now i should question the credibility of this book being that all the examples are like this.... that's a big mistake to miss...

*no sarcasm was in that.... i realize it sounds sarcastic but It's not, I honestly wonder about the books credibility."
#8
Quote by S0ulja23
A C/E means that its a C chord with the E as its bass note (if I phrased that right..), rather than the C. I think in your example the low E string should be the open string..

Chord Inversions are when one of the other chord tones are played as the bass note rather than the tonic. E.g. Starting a C chord on the 3rd (Which in this case would be an E) would give you a chord inversion.



So it would be like this...?
C/E
e|----0
B|----1
G|----0
D|----2
A|----3
E|----0
#9
Yes, that would be an example of C/E. To roughly summarize inverted chords: The stuff before the slash is the chord and the note after is the note in the bass.

If you understand that, try to come up with fingerings for these inversions:

G/B
C/G
Am/E
CMaj7/G

The most common inversion is a triad inversion. If you were to invert a simple C Major triad (C, E, G), you would have two choises: The first inversion, where the third is in the bass (E, C, G) or the second inversion where the fifth is in the bass (G, E, C). Iversions are generally used to make a smoother base line. Once you understand all of this, you should have a basic understanding of chord inversions.
#10
to get an inevrsion of a chord, just move every note in it up 1 step in the arpeggio of the chord, so the new bass note is the next note in the arpeggio

example in Cmaj7:

(the bold note is the tonic)
  C  E   G   B
|-----------------
|-5--8--12--[B]13[/B]-
|-4--[B]5[/B]---9--12-
|-5--9--[B]10[/B]--14-
|-[B]3[/B]--7--10--14-
|-----------------

note it always are the same notes, 1 3 5 and 7, ujst in a different order, starting with the new bass note
the example your book gave you was also correct, as it are the same notes (just no 7 which i still recommend) just with a new bass note on to pof it, if you add the note, theres no need to move the chord, if you change the note there usually is

try inversions of every voicing of your basic chords (min, maj, a couple of dominants and perhaps some dim or alt chords depending on your interest) you can think of
1953 Epiphone zephyr
1988 PRS custom 24
1960 Moon oct. mandolin
Last edited by Funkicker at Jul 30, 2008,
#11
answers
G/B
e|----3----
B|----0----
G|----0----
D|----0----
A|----2----
E|----x----
C/B
e|----0----
B|----1----
G|----0----
D|----2----
A|----2----
E|---------
Am/E
e|----0----
B|----1----
G|----2----
D|----2----
A|----x----
E|---------
CMaj7/G
e|----0----
B|----0----
G|----0----
D|----x----
A|----x----
E|----x----



Are these right?

Also I didn't get the last part of what you said... but i'm trying to.

to get an inevrsion of a chord, just move every note in it up 1 step in the arpeggio of the chord, so the new bass note is the next note in the arpeggio

example in Cmaj7:

Code:

(the bold note is the tonic)
C E G B
|-----------------
|-5--8--12--13-
|-4--5---9--12-
|-5--9--10--14-
|-3--7--10--14-
|-----------------
note it always are the same notes, 1 3 5 and 7, ujst in a different order, starting with the new bass note
the example your book gave you was also correct, as it are the same notes (just no 7 which i still recommend) just with a new bass note on to pof it, if you add the note, theres no need to move the chord, if you change the note there usually is

try inversions of every voicing of your basic chords (min, maj, a couple of dominants and perhaps some dim or alt chords depending on your interest) you can think of


Which notes are bolded? and i'm still learning theory and trying to improve knowledge... but man you confused me majority lol.
#12
Thouse are all right, although the second one was supposed to be C/G, but you wrote C/B correctly. For the CMaj7 inversion, I was picturing this fingering:

e|3
B|5
G|4
D|5
A|3
E|3 (note the G in the bass)

but yours works too.

Funkicker appears to be saying pretty much the same thing I said about triads, but applying it to 7th chords