#1
Hey guys, I'm a little new to this, so please don't laugh. So in the circle of fifths, what the heck happens to the sharps and flats? They end abruptly, so what happens on the way back to the C note? Thanks.

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#3
im afraid i dont understand your question.
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#4
@offbeat

From Ab to C there aren't any sharps, so what happened to them?
Same with E to C on the flats part.
Quote by SloppyJoseph
It doesn't fit my playing style at all so I figured it would be good for me
#5
because there are no sharps in the "flat keys"eg, Bb, Ab... and there are no flats in the "sharp keys"eg, abcdeg.
its self explanatory
you cant put a sharp in the Ab key signature or any other flat sig
and you can't put a flat in the key of G or any other sharp sig
Last edited by Jaymee at Jul 29, 2008,
#6
Quote by TheReFiller
@offbeat

From Ab to C there aren't any sharps, so what happened to them?
Same with E to C on the flats part.
Do not post here again until you've read that section of the lesson three times.
#7
they end abrubtly because there are only seven note that can have an accidental, A, B, C, D, E, F, G.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Do not post here again until you've read that section of the lesson three times.


Well, I've read it three times and I think I understand better now. I'm still a little confused though. So, when you go clockwise, when you get to the C# where all the notes are sharps, the rest of the way back to the C is played with accidentals? Or sharps? Uhg, music theory can be confusing.

But I do get everything else, I believe.
Quote by SloppyJoseph
It doesn't fit my playing style at all so I figured it would be good for me
Last edited by TheReFiller at Jul 29, 2008,
#9
Quote by TheReFiller
when you get to the C# where all the notes are sharps, the rest of the way back to the C is played with accidentals? Or sharps?
That would mean you're in the key of C# major. You would write sharps on every notes in the key signature and then not notate any sharps once you start writing the music on the staff (unless you go out of key, but that should be obvious).

Any other questions, please ask. I just want noobs to read that article so they have a foundation from which I can discuss more complex topics. The wording in that article is better than whatever I type on-the-fly, too.

Actually, I suggest reading the entire article at some point...not all at the same time though.

Uhg, music theory can be confusing.
Indeed. However, as with most subjects, you'll struggle immensely for a while and then have an "ah ha!" moment and you'll wonder why it was ever hard.
#10
@sue

Thanks a lot! However, I'm still confused what happens after the C# if you are playing the major scale in sharps. Everything is sharp already, so what happens when you try playing back to C?



Red arrow - What happens here sharps wise?
Green arrow - What happens here flats wise?

Meh. I probably don't make any sense.
Quote by SloppyJoseph
It doesn't fit my playing style at all so I figured it would be good for me
#11
7 sharps or flats is the limit for key signatures, so basically you just don't go clockwise past C major or anticlockwise past Cb major. G# major (which would theoretically come after C# major) would have the notes G# A# B# C# D# E# Fx (x means 'double sharp', ##), this exceeds the limit for sharps/flats in a key sig, so you use Ab major instead.
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#12
Quote by Ænimus Prime
7 sharps or flats is the limit for key signatures, so basically you just don't go clockwise past C major or anticlockwise past Cb major. G# major (which would theoretically come after C# major) would have the notes G# A# B# C# D# E# Fx (x means 'double sharp', ##), this exceeds the limit for sharps/flats in a key sig, so you use Ab major instead.


Thank you so much. I think I get it now!
Quote by SloppyJoseph
It doesn't fit my playing style at all so I figured it would be good for me
#13
Quote by TheReFiller
Thank you so much. I think I get it now!


If you really want to know how those "enharmonic" major scales are formed (G# maj instead of Ab, etc), remember that the sum of the alterations of both enharmonic scales is 12 (C# has 7 sharps and Db has 5 flats).
And to find where the double sharps and double flats go, just do it as if it were a natural scale (G instead of G#maj or F instead of Fb), and follow the FCGDAEB and BEADGCF (which would repeat itself for ## and bb, but up till FCGDA and BEADG) and find the alterations, and alter it back (easier I suppose).
Those scales aren't common and their enharmonic ones are used instead....