#1
ok i can never find a website with good chord progresions, and i need some for phrygian dominant which is a mode of the harmonic minor scale.

can any one list a few, and is there some kind of formula that you can apply to any scale to come up with chord progresions or something?
#2
Try I bvii bII, that is E Dm F for E phrygian dominant.
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#3
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Try I bvii bII, that is E Dm F for E phrygian dominant.


Can it also be E5,D5,F5, and E5?
#4
Quote by herman ri2
Can it also be E5,D5,F5, and E5?

Absolutely. The power chords give you a lot of freedom because of their ambiguous tonality.
#5
Quote by Spawn_142001

and is there some kind of formula that you can apply to any scale to come up with chord progresions or something?


Yes. Each scale degree has a Roman Numeral associated with it. You build a chord of each of those degrees. Will stop there for now.
#6
Quote by :-D
Absolutely. The power chords give you a lot of freedom because of their ambiguous tonality.
And leave out the notes essential for outlining a mode or for resolving.

I know this goes out of key but I've seen this done in a few jazz songs: I bII bIII. Pretty much any mixture of those 3 chords, with the I chord played more than the others, sounds very phrygian dominant to me.

I also like Andy's progression, but you probably wouldnt want to leave out the thirds.

and is there some kind of formula that you can apply to any scale to come up with chord progresions or something?
There is... But it gets sort of complicated when you start using modes of the harmonic/melodic minor scale.

Heres a repost of mine about how to construct major modal progressions:
What most musicians mean by modes is 'modal progressions', where the progression will specifically point to a specific mode. This is achieved by outlining that specific mode (usually dorian as it's the easiest).

But how do you outline a mode?
Each mode has a special note that only that mode has, in dorian it is its natural sixth, aeolian is an exception to this. BTW you should know the formula's of the modes before using them, not just their fingerings. Alot of guys call this special note the modal note.

So all we do is find chord that contain this special note. In D dorian these chords are G7, Bm7b5 and Em. But, we cant just throw these chords together, we have to make sure we dont resolve to the I chord of the parent scale, or else all modal feeling will be lost. So that means we cant use Bm7b5, as it only really moves to C well. I personally wouldnt use Em, as it doesnt really move well (in my opinion) to either Dm or G7. So this leaves us with G7, which still contains the modal note and still moves well to Dm.

So our progression is: Dm7 - G7.
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Harmonic minor modal progressions would be sort of weird to construct. Not only would you need a progression that uses the modal note (phyrgian dominants modal note is still b2) but, as a guess, I think you would also have to use the new note in that scale (G# in A minor).
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#7
phrygian dominant is just phrygian with a raised third...right?
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#8
Quote by Stolen Identity
phrygian dominant is just phrygian with a raised third...right?


Yes, anything dominant whether it be a scale or chord will have a major 3rd and b7 in it.