#1
Mhm. So I've learned the Major scale, and the whole theory behind intervals and semitones and wholestones. I've learned all I can about modes I believe. I've applied many modes all over the fretboard and learned how to apply it.

Although about that, I have a question.

Modes are their own scales right, their parent scales have nothing to do with them?

and my other question is, what should I try to learn now?
#2
you should learn other scales, you've learnt the major scale and the modes - which is a strange step but still - so learn minor, harmonic minor, melodic minor, pentatonic, blues etc. learn the shapes and the theory.

also, learn how to break the rules of theory to suit yourself. this, unfortunatley, can only really be done by experimenting.
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#5
okay then, you seem to know a fair bit about scales, so learn about harmonising two guitar parts together, and inverted chords, chords with different notes in the bass, extended chords, stuff like that. what's a good song without a good backing and a cool harmony or two hey?
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#6
Actually.

I don't know too much about scales. Because I'm not sure how to apply those intervals to the fretboard, could you help me out with that? You've helped me before, and that's why you rock. Haha.

I just can't grasp the interval thing. Are all formulas related to the major scale of that name?

like... to apply 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 to the fretboard... what would I do? Say I wanted an F harmonized minor scale... how would I use those intervals to work with it and construct one?
#7
okies, here we go:
everything scale wise revolves around the major scale, it is the mother and all other scales are the little babbies

major scale = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
C D E F G A B C

minor scale = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 8
C D Eb F G Ab Bb C

to harmonise in any key signature, you use specifically the notes within that scale. some harmonies are nice, others horrible. the most common harmony is the diatinic 3rd, which means a mix of both major and minor 3 intervals from within the scale/key signature that you are working with.

C - E = major 3rd
C - Eb = minor 3rd

you just use this method and move it around dependant what key you're in.
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If you get a virus by looking at porn, is it considered a sexually-transmitted disease?

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#8
I see. Hmm.
Well, I'm not sure I understand the harmonies, I'll look into that, but I understand the interval part, or is it called harmony when you use formulas to make new scales?

( Haha, I know I sound stupid but I've heard harmony called a lot of things, and I always just thought that was what was in almost every Avenged Sevenfold song during duel solos. )

Anyways...
so like...

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
F Major: F G A Bb C D E F

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 8
F Minor: F G Ab Bb C bD E F

right?
Last edited by Gizmo Factory at Jul 30, 2008,
#9
Harmony is basically 2 or more notes played at the same time -- like a chord.
A song's chord progression is essentially the harmony of the song. It's considered
the "vertical" aspect of music because the notes occur vertically in the tab or
music notation. Melody, in contrast, is "horizontal" where notes are separated by
time.

You can "harmonize" a melody line by playing the melody as dyads or triads or
antyhing more than 1 note at a time. Diatonic intervals are generally used to
harmonize (ie a melody may be 2 notes at a time played a diatonic 3rd apart).

As far as "what next"... I've been playing 30 years and I could STILL easily spend the
rest of my life just working on major scale practicing. There's no end of things to
know about it. If you've run out of stuff on it already, you're just not thinking
hard enough about it. Can you play diatonic intervals anywhere, up and down the
neck or across it? Arpeggiated triads? Arpeggiated 7ths? Braids? A variety of
patterns? ... just a few things that come to mind.
#11
Quote by Gizmo Factory

Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Harmonic Minor: 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 7
Melodic Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7

Quote by Gizmo Factory

Anyways...
so like...

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
F Major: F G A Bb C D E F

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 8
F Minor: F G Ab Bb C bD E F

right?


Yeah you got it.

Everything relates back to the Major Scale.
C Major = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = C D E F G A B
C Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = C D Eb F G Ab Bb

Chord progressions are a good thing to study. The strongest progression is the V-I. In the minor scale the b7 weakens this progression. It is the third in the V chord and causes this chord to become minor. In order to restore the strength of this progression it is common to raise the b7 to a natural 7 creating a major V chord. This is how the Harmonic Minor scale came to be.
C Harmonic Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 = C D Eb F G Ab B

The natural 7 was also useful when ascending melodically because the half step leads so strongly back to the root note. However it created a large an unacceptable three semitone leap between the b6 and the natural 7. To solve this the b6 was raised to a natural 6. This smooths out the step pattern and makes a smoother melodic run up to the root note. This is how the Melodic Minor scale came to be.
C Melodic Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 = C D Eb F G A B

The half step between the 7 and 8 isn't as important when descending, but the big leap of the Harmonic Minor still posed problems. So traditionally the Natural Minor scale was used when descending away from the root and the Melodic Minor when ascending toward the root. This isn't the case as much today with the Melodic Minor used ascending and descending.

Like edg said Harmony is when two or more notes sound together at the same time. Melody is when they sound one after another.

I would look at harmony and composition now if I were you. Learn how to form chords from the scales you know and how to put the chords together to create progressions. Pay attention and keep notes on how the chords affect each other when used in specific sequences. Try to figure out why they create that effect.

Learn how to harmonize melodies with a second melody as well as with chord progressions and how to write melodies over existing chord progressions. You may well know this stuff already but if not it's good to learn.

As edg said Arpeggios and intervals within the scales are great things to have at your finger tip. I don't know what braids are so will have to look that one up.

Anyway Good Luck
Si