#1
After learning guitar for a while, I have the skill to learn all the riffs and verses that my band wants me to, but we've had to play without solos for most songs except for Let it Be since I've memorized that solo. The problem is I can't really get the feel for the pentatonic scale and such to improvise and jam well, even though I do know most scales by heart. I've been told a good way is to learn old classic blues solos and work to get the right feel for hard rock soloing like Joe Perry and Slash.

If this is true, could someone recommend some good old blues solos for me to learn that would help me get the feel? Other soloing tips would be great too .
#3
You could go the van halen route,and learn eric clapton's cream solos,like crossroads or cats squirell

you cood learn some acdc ones,you shook me all night long is very bluesy,as is hells bells...

or maybe even learn some jimi hendrix or SRV
meh
#4
I think that what you need to do is just keep playing until you get
it will be hard to really imitate another guitar player's tone and it would be a lot easier to just play what you think of, but really all it takes is time and more time
if you have any kind of recording program, record the core rhythm of the song you want to solo to and keep playing over that
I am coining new words like 'misunderstanding' and 'Hispanically'

"Civilization is unbearable, but it is less unbearable at the top"
-Timothy Leary

crit my songs (click on my profile)
#5
most definitely Clapton... Also, John Mayer has some pentatonic stuff... Also Stevie Ray Vaughn- the sky is crying. That's a fabulous song... A great solo... yes Hendrix. Ummm B.B. King. Things of that nature... just listen to blues stuff. It's all good
#6
any specific solos that are good or primarily around the blues and pentatonic scales?

thanks for all the suggestions so far
#7
haha i was just listening to all around the watchtower by hendrix, i suggest you take a look at that, it has some great blues runs in it,

and crossroads by eric clapton has some great idea in it too, it follows a variation of the 12 bar blues

2 very good songs for blues
Gear:
Maton MS503
Squier Strat
Randall RG75DG3+
H & K 100W Switchblade
Dunlop Original Crybaby
Digitech Crossroads
Digitech Jamman
Zoom G1

Quote by Sol9989
Caramello wins life.

Quote by A8039077
Caramello, that's mother****ing genius!
#8
Albert King has influenced many players... shades of his early work (cold feet, pretty woman, born under a bad sign..etc) can be heard in many of the blues solos that clapton, hendrix and others played...

he did more with three or four notes than some shredders will ever be able to do...

wolf
#9
B.B King and Clapton are the most popular blues guitarists
Just remember, at the end of the game, the king and the pawn go in the same box
#10
One thing I like to do is listen to a nice slow blues song and improvise little licks over the top of it. If I come up with anything I like the sound of, I'll write it down as I go.
Practice. Play. Sleep. Repeat.

Quote by pearlJam_31490
i take it next your going to tell me that Cb is a note too!
#11
bell bottom blues i s a nice slow one by clapton or you could try sweet home chicago
#12
I think one of the best things to do is get your band or a recording to play a blues progression over and over again, and you can just solo over it as long as you like. The only way to get comfortable with something like that is to actually do it.