#1
I'm looking into really fine tuning my legato playing. However it isn't the technique or execution that I have a problem with, it's the construction of phrases.

Lessons that simply show the one scale played with legato phrasing don't help, I can do those in my sleep - I'm looking at legato phrases that fit well over chord progressions etc.

Other than for warmups and a few lines here and there I've never really incorporated any serious legato in to my live playing, and I want to start. Any tips or links?
Fender 60W Super-Sonic Head
Fender 2x12 Cabinet (Vintage 30s)
TC Electronics G Major
Boss Blues Driver BD-2 w/ Keeley mod
MXR 6 Band EQ
BB Preamp
TS-9
Jim Dunlop Crybaby Wah

American Fender Stratocaster
#2
paul gilbert - master legato phrasing practitioner.
look for lessons and dvds.
Quote by Mr. La Fritz

Squirrels are fluffy bits of gay.


Quote by LordPino
My penis is so big it has its own hands.
#3
Learn lots of Joe Satriani licks. He is an increadably inventive legato player; I've probably learned more from his music than from any teacher I've ever had.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#4
Quote by StriferDiem
I'm looking into really fine tuning my legato playing. However it isn't the technique or execution that I have a problem with, it's the construction of phrases.

Lessons that simply show the one scale played with legato phrasing don't help, I can do those in my sleep - I'm looking at legato phrases that fit well over chord progressions etc.

Other than for warmups and a few lines here and there I've never really incorporated any serious legato in to my live playing, and I want to start. Any tips or links?


watch this video: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5339353481355336038&q=petrucci+lesson&ei=bAmRSLG5Np22qgPH2eSzCA

its a john petrucci lesson where he does a lot of talking about phrasing. he picks most of it, but it's the sequences that he shows you that are important, not how he plays them-they can be played legato once learned. but basically he uses major scale shapes (you must know your mode shapes) and switches between them, spanning the entire fretboard. i remember seeing the video before i knew the mode shapes and i couldnt figure out what patterns he was using. but basically he'll take a shape, for example Ionian in the key of C, he'll play the shape on the 6th and 5th string, then on the fifth string he shifts up one scale tone and plays the dorian shape of the C major scale on the 5th and 4th string, and so on. if you go through all 7 shapes the result is landing on the root note you started on, but on the 1st string, 3 octaves higher. he also shows you how to use this with descending patterns as well. i hope this makes sense/helps.
#5
Quote by Iron_Dude
Learn lots of Joe Satriani licks. He is an increadably inventive legato player; I've probably learned more from his music than from any teacher I've ever had.



this is a good idea, and so is the above one that mentioned pilbert. satch will give you a lot of weird sounding ideas you probably never thought of. another good player to listen to would be Allan Holdsworth, the master of legato. and for switching between legato and picking i would check out Shawn Lane
#6
Learn licks from "any" Neo-classical metal/rock guitarist, Satrani, batio, petrucci, malmsteen, gilbert, ect. but nothing from dragonforce, all they do is scales fast.
#7
Quote by Dumpster510
but basically he uses major scale shapes (you must know your mode shapes) and switches between them, spanning the entire fretboard.

Mode shapes is a no no. He needs to learn the different patterns of the major scale, NOT the modes. They are two entirely different things.

Quote by MikeD91
but nothing from dragonforce, all they do is scales fast.

Well guess what, so do all the other guitarists you metioned.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#8
Quote by Iron_Dude
Mode shapes is a no no. He needs to learn the different patterns of the major scale, NOT the modes. They are two entirely different things.


Well guess what, so do all the other guitarists you metioned.


mode shapes = the major scale shapes....idk what you're talking about :| maybe i confused you by calling them mode shapes but i think we're saying the same thing here.
#9
Quote by Dumpster510
mode shapes = the major scale shapes....idk what you're talking about :| maybe i confused you by calling them mode shapes but i think we're saying the same thing here.

I know what you meant, but I doubt the TS did. Modes and major scale positions are not the same thing. They may have the same notes, but they have entirely different functions.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#10
Quote by Iron_Dude
I know what you meant, but I doubt the TS did. Modes and major scale positions are not the same thing. They may have the same notes, but they have entirely different functions.


in the context of that video i think its quite clear i was talking about the major scale
#11
I don't find that there's any substantial difference between being able to
practice legato and using it in solos, or constructing phrases with legato as
some sort of special case of phrase. If you "can do them in your sleep" there
must be another problem.

Are you practicing them slowly and in time to a metronome so that all your
hammer ons and pulloffs are clear (preferable without a load of distortion)?
Legato can actually be more difficult to do when its slow and deliberate.
#12
also, i know it may be kind of obvious, but you can always come up with picking sequences/phrases and then just change them to fit your legato technique.
#13
Quote by edg
I don't find that there's any substantial difference between being able to
practice legato and using it in solos, or constructing phrases with legato as
some sort of special case of phrase. If you "can do them in your sleep" there
must be another problem.

Are you practicing them slowly and in time to a metronome so that all your
hammer ons and pulloffs are clear (preferable without a load of distortion)?
Legato can actually be more difficult to do when its slow and deliberate.


Well I don't just want to run up and down scale patterns. That is the easy part.

I want advice on constructing melodic patterns. I know it is something I can sit and do myself (which I do), but the point of posting here was to see how others have learnt to do it.
Fender 60W Super-Sonic Head
Fender 2x12 Cabinet (Vintage 30s)
TC Electronics G Major
Boss Blues Driver BD-2 w/ Keeley mod
MXR 6 Band EQ
BB Preamp
TS-9
Jim Dunlop Crybaby Wah

American Fender Stratocaster
#14
Quote by StriferDiem

I want advice on constructing melodic patterns.


If you have a chord progression, try basing some melodic lines over that progression which outline the notes of the chords. Takes a bit of thought too.
#15
Quote by StriferDiem
Well I don't just want to run up and down scale patterns. That is the easy part.

I want advice on constructing melodic patterns. I know it is something I can sit and do myself (which I do), but the point of posting here was to see how others have learnt to do it.


Then your thread has the wrong title. Read my 4th lesson in my sig and that's pretty in depth.
#16
Quote by edg

Legato can actually be more difficult to do when its slow and deliberate.


Very, very true.
#17
Quote by StriferDiem
Well I don't just want to run up and down scale patterns. That is the easy part.

I want advice on constructing melodic patterns. I know it is something I can sit and do myself (which I do), but the point of posting here was to see how others have learnt to do it.

Then you've been approaching scales the wrong way - you simply need to spend more time exploring and using scales, after all they're not something to play, they're something to help you play.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com