#1
So I've been playing for a while now, and I can solo in major keys pretty well, but my ultimate goal (for now) is to play rock and blues. I know about blues and pentatonic scales, but what kind of chord progression do I play them to?

Are there specific blues chords or pentatonic chords? I understand the concept of the I IV V 12 bar blues, but I'm not sure what to play. What kind of chord progression would be in the key of for example, e minior pentatonic?

Thanks
#2
Quote by MjolnirMan
So I've been playing for a while now, and I can solo in major keys pretty well, but my ultimate goal (for now) is to play rock and blues. I know about blues and pentatonic scales, but what kind of chord progression do I play them to?

Are there specific blues chords or pentatonic chords? I understand the concept of the I IV V 12 bar blues, but I'm not sure what to play. What kind of chord progression would be in the key of for example, e minior pentatonic?

Thanks


My understanding of the pentatonics is that you don't use them to write chord progressions. Pentatonics are merely scales that have all of the "good sounding"intervals in them. The blues scale is just the minor pentatonic scale with a b5 included.

I believe it's just the same for the blues scale. They're only scales to solo or write a melody with, not write chord progressions.

Then again, I could be wrong.
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#3
That makes sense, or at least seems to be a good useful way of looking at it. So would I just play e minor pentatonic to the key of e minor? Could I also play it to G major?
#5
Quote by MjolnirMan
That makes sense, or at least seems to be a good useful way of looking at it. So would I just play e minor pentatonic to the key of e minor? Could I also play it to G major?


Yeah, you can use the e minor pentatonic in the key of e minor.

Well, as long as the focus isn't on E but on G, then you could I guess. Though really it would just be better to use the G major pentatonic.
Proud Owner of a Fender Jazz 24 V

Private Simmons of the Red vs. Blue club. PM Fret13 to join.

Things to come:
Carvin or Trace-elliot rig
EBS Valvedrive (Newest edition )
#6
Quote by Funkbass796
Yeah, you can use the e minor pentatonic in the key of e minor.

Well, as long as the focus isn't on E but on G, then you could I guess. Though really it would just be better to use the G major pentatonic.


lol this is kind of misleading.

The e minor and g major pentatonic have the same notes but different roots. So if you played e minor pentatonic over a g major progression and use your ear to resolve.. you'' be using the g major pentatonic.
#7
ah cool. thanks. So does anyone have any suggestions for good chord progressions to play pentatonic over, other than the I IV V 12 bar?
#9
You can play pentatonics over a lot of things -- just about anything.
If you had a progression in E minor, E minor pentatonic would be likely.
If you had a progression in E major, it's more interesting. You could play E major
pentatonic, but ALSO E minor pentatonic. The latter, gives you most of your
blues kind of sound and a lot of rock as well, the former is kind of country-ish.
#12
The bluesy sound comes from I-IV-V in a major key with a melody written in the minor pentatonic over top. The pentatonic can be played strictly starting on the root of the chord progression, or it can move with the changes.

As for the chord progression itself, I-IV-V in a major or minor scale (I prefer major). I use a lot of dominant seventh chords, with a catchy turn around.

The tricky thing about blues is it makes almost no theoretical sense, so you pretty much just have to try stuff out and see what happens.

P.S. I probably don't have to say this but use a lot of bends, nothing like bends in the blues.
Last edited by lumpy890 at Aug 1, 2008,