#1
Ok so I've been playing 3 years now and I suck. I never stick and learn one song I always do to different ones and never learn full songs. But the thing is I want to get faster and have plenty of time to practice. What should I practice to increase speed? Scales (which scales, also)? Buy a metronome? Can someone help?
#3
scales, any scale really. major and minor sound beter than pentatonic, do 3 notes per string type stuff. and perhaps to solve your problem of never learning a whole song... learn the whole damn thing! most songs have lots of repition anyway
#4
Learn modes? And hell, make up your own scales sometimes! Marty Friedman suggests it even. Gives your own sound.

But first off, play everything SLOW. I used to have the same problem learning only parts of songs, and there are a few songs that I can play fully, afterall.

Write your own riffs, maybe.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#5
Quote by Wylde14
scales, any scale really. major and minor sound beter than pentatonic, do 3 notes per string type stuff. and perhaps to solve your problem of never learning a whole song... learn the whole damn thing! most songs have lots of repition anyway

Dunno, my favorite key to mess around in is A and E. I mostly wank around in pentatonics. A Mixolydian as well (just recently).

On a side issue, I can't seem to do much with the major scale, except mellow stuff. But I'm stuck on that. I'm looking for ideas on mellow music..
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#6
Practice precision first. Without that speed is just noise.
If you can master efficiency of motion in a chosen technique (tremolo, legato, whatever) at a lower speed, then you can apply what you've learned at a slightly higher speed and build your mechanical ability from there.
#7
I have seen myself get better by learning a song completely, then learn increasingly harder songs, one thing to remember is to not rush it, it takes time

Gibson Les Paul Studio Wine Red w/ Gold Hardware
Gibson SG Faded Worn Cherry
Fender Classic Series 70's Stratocaster Olympic White
Boss DS-1 Distortion Pedal
Dunlop Original Wah Pedal
Fender Frontman 25R
#8
Quote by md41
Learn modes? And hell, make up your own scales sometimes! Marty Friedman suggests it even. Gives your own sound.

DO NOT DIVE RIGHT INTO THE MODES! However, for you overall guitar playing, I would suggest learning some theory. For practicing speed, well that just takes pure time and dedications.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#9
its been a long time since i've gotten to say this so i'll gladly say it

speed is a byproduct of accuracy

let me reiterate for its importance

SPEED is a BYPRODUCT of ACCURACY

what this means is that the more accurate and comfortable you are playing the easier it will be to play quicker. if you try to play fast without being able to do it accurately and cleanly, it will sound like absolute garbage.

i personally think speed is one of those things that will come to you when you're ready for it, it becomes natural after a while once your hands and brain become attuned to the tiny movements that are made when playing. in other words, don't force it. if you really want to be able to play faster, then simply play comfortably to a metronome. do this a LOT. i personally didn't get start to get fast until i had been playing for around 3 or 4 years, then i had to rework my technique and lost all that speed because i wasn't playing accurately and it did indeed sound awful. luckily for me it didn't set me back too far. i recommend playing with a proper technique from the beginning and it will be easier to get comfortable and play accurately quicker.
#10
Quote by z4twenny
its been a long time since i've gotten to say this so i'll gladly say it

speed is a byproduct of accuracy

let me reiterate for its importance

SPEED is a BYPRODUCT of ACCURACY

what this means is that the more accurate and comfortable you are playing the easier it will be to play quicker. if you try to play fast without being able to do it accurately and cleanly, it will sound like absolute garbage.

i personally think speed is one of those things that will come to you when you're ready for it, it becomes natural after a while once your hands and brain become attuned to the tiny movements that are made when playing. in other words, don't force it. if you really want to be able to play faster, then simply play comfortably to a metronome. do this a LOT. i personally didn't get start to get fast until i had been playing for around 3 or 4 years, then i had to rework my technique and lost all that speed because i wasn't playing accurately and it did indeed sound awful. luckily for me it didn't set me back too far. i recommend playing with a proper technique from the beginning and it will be easier to get comfortable and play accurately quicker.
^^+1
I have had to revise some of my technique also and work out some deficiencies that have held me back. If only I had practiced correctly from the start.
Si
#11
I hate to point it out, but if you suck now and get fast, all you'll do is suck faster.

You need to get better all round. Can you construct melodies, do you understand chords and and scales, do you strive for clean and comfortable playing?
#12
Apologies in advance for the philosophical bull, but....

Every fast lick starts it's life as a slow lick.

You have to play slow to play fast. Something that is accurate but slow will sound better than it being fast and sloppy.
#14
Quote by Freepower
I hate to point it out, but if you suck now and get fast, all you'll do is suck faster.


lol, this is exactly what i was saying

TS please make sure you sound good at 8 nps instead of sucking at 15 nps. because sh!t is still sh!t regardless of how fast it is.
#15
Quote by Freepower
I hate to point it out, but if you suck now and get fast, all you'll do is suck faster.

You need to get better all round. Can you construct melodies, do you understand chords and and scales, do you strive for clean and comfortable playing?

Yes this is so true.
Play what you want to play (song, scale riff lick it doesnt matter what) at a speed that you can play it cleanly without tension. Stay loose relaxed and have patience. Focus on doing everything technique wise correctly and smoothly. Even if you have to play at 40 bpm do it. Then when your clean and smooth and relaxed increase your tempo and repeat. Do this for everything you want to learn. Then you will become good at playing your guitar and you can play fast. Its been said a million times ill say it again to play fast you have to play slow.
#17
Quote by Freepower
I hate to point it out, but if you suck now and get fast, all you'll do is suck faster.

You need to get better all round. Can you construct melodies, do you understand chords and and scales, do you strive for clean and comfortable playing?

Well I don't really suck. I guess I just meant I'm not as fast as I wanted to be by now. And yes I understand some theory, I'm reading a book on it right now.

So what should I do to practice getting faster but not sucking at it?
#19
you are talking about 2 subjects here. One is how your muscles remember the movements and secondly is the physical aspect. Most players recognise the first. If you are a sports person, say a cyclist then you can experience similar problems in terms of speed. The answer here is to vary exercise. Don't just ride the bike! do some wieghts and focus training on weakness and vary routines. Guitar is no different in many ways. So ,, to cut to the chase, don't try too hard on speed but use focused routines. Split up you practice time into short specific routine to help technical development. Practice these every day for a planned length of time. This way speed will come naturally as your fingers adapt. let me know if you want some ideas on routines.
#20
Quote by mick13

So what should I do to practice getting faster but not sucking at it?


* facepalm *

anything you can play cleanly at "slow" speeds
#21
theres a steve vai video on youtube and he answers the same question the same way everyone else is.

get a metronome. start off very slowly and gradually get faster. it does take time though, and that's a personal battle. and once you learn one technique blazing fast, that doesn't mean all of your techniques will be fast, you have to condition each one seperately.
#22
Quote by mick13
So what should I do to practice getting faster but not sucking at it?


Well, in my profile there's 7 lessons. Thats pretty much all I think most people need to know about practice and what to practice, although unfortunately sucking at it is still possible with determined innattention.

Oh, and I did the first 3 in order, which I'd strongly recommend reading from start to finish. And have your guitar handy to try the stuff out.
#23
Quote by mick13
Ok so I've been playing 3 years now and I suck. I never stick and learn one song I always do to different ones and never learn full songs. But the thing is I want to get faster and have plenty of time to practice. What should I practice to increase speed? Scales (which scales, also)? Buy a metronome? Can someone help?



Learn all the positions of the major scale and practice them up and down. I would learn them in 3 notes per string first but whatever is good. First play them up and down in eighth notes, but then you can learn them in triplets, sixteenth notes and then sextuplets.

Also, at the same time learn the scale in different patterns..

So for starters, your schedule should be something like this:

1) Run up and down the first position of the major scale ("Ionian position") in eighth notes

2) Run up an down the same position in triplets

3) Run up and down the minor/major pentatonic in the same key


After a few days of that move up to the 2nd position of the "Dorian Position" and the second position of the pentatonic... Then after practicing that move up to the 3rd position.. etc.


---

After you can run up and down the scales in the different positions and have no trouble visualizing them. Go up and down them in different patterns.. like thirds, 3 note coils.. etc.

At the same time I would start practicing switching between positions.


Oh and while you do all this, learn the theory behind the major scales.. and then modes
#24
Well as for theory I can read music, I know the concept of chord progressions, understand major and minor keys and scales, etc. I am tryign to learn about modes now.


Okay, let's say I practiced one scale with a metrenome and gradually got faster. Wouldn't just increase my speed with that certain scale, not speed in general??

Oh and what would be a good scale to practice with?
#25
Quote by mick13
Well as for theory I can read music, I know the concept of chord progressions, understand major and minor keys and scales, etc. I am tryign to learn about modes now.


Okay, let's say I practiced one scale with a metrenome and gradually got faster. Wouldn't just increase my speed with that certain scale, not speed in general??

Oh and what would be a good scale to practice with?

http://www.ultimate-guitar.tv/guitar_lessons/shred_masterclass_speedpicking.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.tv/guitar_lessons/shred_masterclass_speed_build-ups.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.tv/guitar_lessons/shred_masterclass_stacking_picking_patterns.html


That last video isn't really a speed lesson, but you can make it one. Just do each of those picking patterns and practice them slowly until you have it perfect, then speed it up a little and exc.
#26
Quote by mick13
Well as for theory I can read music, I know the concept of chord progressions, understand major and minor keys and scales, etc. I am tryign to learn about modes now.


Okay, let's say I practiced one scale with a metrenome and gradually got faster. Wouldn't just increase my speed with that certain scale, not speed in general??

Oh and what would be a good scale to practice with?

Yes, it would - running straight up and down scales is of limited use, IMO it's a pretty worthless exercise.

If you know your theory then you should be able to construct yourself some useful, and above all pratcical, exercises from them.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#27
Quote by steven seagull
Yes, it would - running straight up and down scales is of limited use, IMO it's a pretty worthless exercise.

If you know your theory then you should be able to construct yourself some useful, and above all pratcical, exercises from them.

So practicing scales doesn't get you faster playing skills?
#28
Quote by mick13
So practicing scales doesn't get you faster playing skills?

No, it just makes you faster at playing scales.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com