#1
ok for a while now i have not been changing out the strings on my guitar by myself but let someone else do it for me. now they have done a very good job stringing it up but with every new person the same problem appears: my strings get harder to tune and when they are left in a tune for a while and when i tune to something else the new tune is hard to get to and when i get back to the normal tuning its hard to keep the normal tuning.

i know its confusing. its like the tuners are keeping the string tense or something and i was wondering if you guys had the same problem or if you know whats going on.

my acoustic is a ibanez full body with the pegs at the bottom and the three on each side neck tuners.

one example is when i tuned for goo goo dolls "iris" one or two snap from being too low and being tuned back up.


also whats the best way to string up a guitar? i would like to know so i can do it myself. thanks
#2
thats kool. that makes me feel better. but what about my problems with the strings loosing tune and also i forgot to add loosing tune while i play?
#3
i think medium hard. and i dont use stell i dont think. i just took whatever the store guy gave me. why?
#4
Think it might be because your strings are new so they need to be stretched?
#5
Er... If you're using mediums on a guitar made to have light strings then the strings could be binding on the nut because the strings are too fat to fit into the nut properly. This is one possibility that could explain both the tuning and string breakage problems.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
my strings get harder to tune and when they are left in a tune for a while and when i tune to something else the new tune is hard to get to and when i get back to the normal tuning its hard to keep the normal tuning.


You know how if you say the same word enough it starts to no make sense and doesnt even sound like a real word anymore. I feel that way about the word tune now.
Anyways, are your tuning pegs difficult to turn. And what sort of tunings are we talking about? Do you go above standard tuning often?
#7
If you tune a string up from normal Concert pitch, you have stretched it. When you tune back down it will never sound the same. Also, do yourself a favour and go to this site and scroll down the page to find out how to professionally re-string your guitar. Anything else you will ever need to know is also there.

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html
Last edited by Akabilk at Jul 31, 2008,
#8
I'm not sure if this is it, but new strings need to be re-tuned more because the strings have to stretch out. What I do when I restring is physically lift the strings p a bit to stretch them out. No matter how its re-strung a long as the strings are new they'll get untuned a bit while they're new.

Though I only use standard and drop D, but i assume it would be similar for any other tuning.
#9
Quote by Akabilk
If you tune a string up from normal Concert pitch, you have stretched it. When you tune back down it will never sound the same. Also, do yourself a favour and go to this site and scroll down the page to find out how to professionally re-string your guitar. Anything else you will ever need to know is also there.

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html


Care to explain to me then why it doesn't happen when you bend strings to higher notes? Or fret normally for that matter? Both are bringing the string to a note higher than concert pitch, and subsequently stretching the strings. I don't buy it one bit. Perhaps if the strings were overtuned to a higher than concert pitch for a substantial length of time and left there, then lowered, but I believe the TS is changing tunings fairly often. I'm with Captivate on this one. He's using a gauge of string that the nut of his guitar can't accommodate, and the strings are binding in the nut slots.
TS, try using a set of .012's on that guitar, and be sure to wrap the strings up at the tuning posts correctly. You want to be passing the string through the hole in the tuning peg first, then making sure you have enough slack in the bulk of the string along it's main length to make the necessary amount of wraps around the post. The first wrap needs to be over the top of the hole, away from the headstock, then 2-3 wraps below the hole, between the hole and the face of the headstock. This will create a lock on the string and keep it from slipping once tuned up.
#10
would a sign for having a to high of guage of strings on a guitar be the difficultly of playing the guitar? when i get done playing on it my hands really hurt but when i try someone elses they're strings feel way better and even at the guitar shop some of the expensive acoustic guitars feel way better too on the strings.
#11
Quote by DarkBeta
would a sign for having a to high of guage of strings on a guitar be the difficultly of playing the guitar? when i get done playing on it my hands really hurt but when i try someone elses they're strings feel way better and even at the guitar shop some of the expensive acoustic guitars feel way better too on the strings.


Not necessarily. If the guitar is set up right, it will be easy to play regardless. I have medium strings(which are pretty heavy strings) on my Martin. However, my guitar was set up for mediums and it plays quite well. A properly set up guitar with light strings will play even easier than my guitar though.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#12
Quote by LeftyDave
Care to explain to me then why it doesn't happen when you bend strings to higher notes? Or fret normally for that matter? Both are bringing the string to a note higher than concert pitch, and subsequently stretching the strings. I don't buy it one bit.


If you don't buy it one bit, I'm comfortable with that. In my humble opinion and knowledge after 35yrs of playing, building and repairing guitars and Banjos: When you temporally bend a note your raising it's pitch by about 1/2 a tone or maybe a little more with a serious bend and because it's temporary, the string isn't permanently stretched [there is a built in temporary elasticity in any string].

What I was talking about was when a string is taken up a whole tone as happens with some open tunings, the string will stay stretched if left in that tunning for awhile. When tuned back a tone, it won't sound the same. It will be the 'odd' man out in a clean strum even though it's tuned to correct pitch. I just cheaply replace the string as I buy them individually by the dozen [not brand packets that are all made in only 4 string factories in the world .Gibson and all of the string brands don't make their own strings by the way]. Helps to do a few pre-stretched strings to have on hand. I've got a junk guitar that I use just to pre-stretch strings as I play professionally and sometimes I break a string and don't want a new string that's going quickly out of tune because it's not pre-stretched!
Last edited by Akabilk at Jul 31, 2008,
#13
how can you find out what the proper gauge of strings you need for your guitar?
#14
Personal choice, experience and playing style I guess. It also depends on the guitar too. Everyone seems to have their own formulas of desirable string thickness for different strings and even on their different guitars.
#15
Quote by Akabilk
Personal choice, experience and playing style I guess. It also depends on the guitar too. Everyone seems to have their own formulas of desirable string thickness for different strings and even on their different guitars.


what guitar guages go with what style?
#16
It's a personal choice obviously. I could tell you my choices, but do you really want me to tell you who's thumb you want to suck on?
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 2, 2008,