#1
Is it a good idea to rely on box patterns? Is it a good idea to just remember the shape of a scale and use that all of the fretboard, or do you prefer building the scale on your own using formulas or Halfsteps and Wholesteps?

Like, if I used the box scale for a C major scale a moved it up to the 5 fret in standar tuning, then wouldn't be an D Major scale? I mean I know it would, but are the notes exactly right, or should you just build the scales?
#2
Knowing the box shapes is great. It's pretty hard to improvise thinking of each individual note, especially if you want to play with any degree of speed. Combining the box shapes with a knowledge of intervals and notes is what will give you the most control.
#3
box shapes no doubt, and know what notes do what together within those shapes...then you can transpose all your favorite licks to any key extremely easily
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"
#4
Knowing the actual notes and knowing when to hit certain ones will give you a greater advantage. With a knowledge of harmony and whatnot, you can go outside a box pattern and make it sound exotic (or not, in some cases), and actually know what you're doing instead of taking chances. You'll also be able to mix scales under the same chord etc. It takes time to learn, but it's a great advantage.
#7
Learning box shapes is great as long as you don't think of a scale as a certain shape.

Balances a strategic use of these shapes along with the knowledge of where else you can play those notes can make you a much better player.

But knowing a box shape is great as long as you know the notes are what make the scale not the shape
#8
Quote by yearzero
Learning box shapes is great as long as you don't think of a scale as a certain shape.

Balances a strategic use of these shapes along with the knowledge of where else you can play those notes can make you a much better player.

But knowing a box shape is great as long as you know the notes are what make the scale not the shape


thank you, that's what I meant by that. I wanted to know if it was the shape or the notes that made the scale. I mean I knew that it was the notes, but I just wanted to see if the shape would make those notes regardless.

Thank you.
#9
Quote by Gizmo Factory
Let me rephase the question a little bit.
Can I learn a box pattern for the entire major scale and then move it aroudn according depending on the root note, without even having to worry about the notes. Or should I build them?

Definitely learn the forms (patterns, shapes, boxes whatever).
There is more than one C major scale pattern. I learned 5 to cover the entire fretboard and another system uses 7 to cover the fretboard.

You will want to learn them all and when playing you will initially just rely on shapes and trying to make the sound fit what is happening. You want to spend time learning the intervals and step patterns so that if you need to change something or someone says this chord uses a flat six you will know where that is and can throw it in no problem.

You want to aim for learning as much as possible. Then practice what you have learnt slowly and deliberately everyday. Then spend some time jamming out everyday without worrying about theory. Eventually everything you have practiced and studied will seep into your playing without a conscious effort.
Si
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
Definitely learn the forms (patterns, shapes, boxes whatever).
There is more than one C major scale pattern. I learned 5 to cover the entire fretboard and another system uses 7 to cover the fretboard.

You will want to learn them all and when playing you will initially just rely on shapes and trying to make the sound fit what is happening. You want to spend time learning the intervals and step patterns so that if you need to change something or someone says this chord uses a flat six you will know where that is and can throw it in no problem.

You want to aim for learning as much as possible. Then practice what you have learnt slowly and deliberately everyday. Then spend some time jamming out everyday without worrying about theory. Eventually everything you have practiced and studied will seep into your playing without a conscious effort.


Good advice. I've been doing a weird thing for the year I've been playing. Well, not weird just not really right. I've been practicing just learning songs, which many people do, but with theory I've already felt much of my understanding and skills increase. So I try to learn both as much as possible.

Thank you though.
#11
Definitely no weird. Everyone does that when they start learning. Don't stop learning new songs either. It is so good for phrasing, and seeing how the theory is used in practice.

If you just learn new songs by tab then always try to work it out on your own first and then compare it to the tab. As you do this more you won't need to check existing tab cause you'll have developed a good ear. Eventually you'll just be able play whatever you hear. A great ear is a real asset to a musician.

Another thing you might want to start looking at is exercises to improve technique and finger mechanics. It will make your playing clearer and more free.
Si
#12
Quote by Gizmo Factory
Is it a good idea to rely on box patterns? Is it a good idea to just remember the shape of a scale and use that all of the fretboard, or do you prefer building the scale on your own using formulas or Halfsteps and Wholesteps?


I have pretty much ingrained scale shapes up and down the neck. In a playing
situation, my fingers can really just move where I want them to. If I had to stop
and think about scale formulas, the music would have long since passed by.

Additionally, I've also learned many other shapes that are *embedded* in the scale
or relate to it in other ways. These help me to understand the various meanings
of the notes I'm using -- any note will have a certain meaning/function in the
overall context of the harmony, but I ALSO can create meanings by how use the
notes in relation to each other.

To me the guitar is a pattern/shape game. It's just that the "box" finger positions
are only a small piece of the puzzle. If you can relate shapes to other shapes you
can also understand what you're playing and do it fast enough and never really
have to think about a note name or a formula.
#13
another really helpful thing thats pretty easy is intervals.

intervals= the spaces between the notes in a scale.

Ex: Maj scale is- 2212221 (or WWHWWWH--meaning, whole steps and half steps)

if you do those steps at any root note. that is the major scale.


if you search for "Learning Music Theory, The Beginning" in the Lessons section, i'm sure you'll find answers to a lot of questions you have.