#2
You can usually imply it by the other chords that outline the key, and/or what is going on in the background.
#3
A power chord (1st and 5th) is neither major nor minor
I'm not sure if that's what you are asking
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#4
It's neither, it's a 5 chord.
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#6
Yeah, that's pretty much it, I think. It's a "power chord" (god I hate that term). If it's used previously, it should feel right. On the other hand, if the whole song is power chords, I don't think you can really tell the tonality unless it's from the mood of the solo. In a triad, it's the 3rd that determines the feel (Major or Minor)

(Wiki)
Music is considered to be tonal if it includes the following five features
*it contains triadic harmonies (three note chords built from major and minor thirds)
etc etc etc etc
#7
Quote by GITARdud391
Pretty much what he said, otherwise its a powerchord.

No, a triad without the third is a 5 chord. There are lots of other chords that are not just simple triads. Other than that, just do what the other guy said. You would have to look at the key and and other chords to see what kind of third is implied.
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#8
Quote by Iron_Dude
No, a triad without the third is a 5 chord. There are lots of other chords that are not just simple triads. Other than that, just do what the other guy said. You would have to look at the key and and other chords to see what kind of third is implied.


Really? Like just the other day someone on here said something about "5 chords". What the hell is a "5 chord"?
#11
No, a triad without the third is a 5 chord.

That's what I was getting at. A 5 chord and a powerchord are the same thing.
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#12
^Ok, I apologize, but 1.) I've never heard the term "5 chord" up until a few days ago and 2.) when the ts said chord I thought it was just assumed that he was talking about triads.

Also I just really have an issue with the term "5 chord" in the first place as "power chords" aren't chords at all, but simply an interval.
#14
Quote by jim morrison714
there are other chords besides 5 chords that omit the 3. suspended chords for example

Your right, sus chords are tonally ambiguious.
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#15
True, but they usually replace the third with another degree, like the 2 or the 4. Honestly though I think we're getting into this way deeper than the ts really needed, but thats usually the case with these threads.
#16
Yeah, but they have enough notes to convey some sort of emotion. While the "Power Chord" only has 2 notes, which create a perfect 5th, which doesn't really have any distinguishable emotion. Suspended chords sometimes aren't considered triads even though they have 3 notes... it's complicated. Depends on the teacher, but I'm not arguing.
#17
Look at everything else. If your chords are E5, F#5, G#5, A5, B5, and C#5(not necessarily in that order), you're pretty much guaranteed to be in E major.
#18
Yeah, I know that a lot of guys wouldn't call a sus chord a triad because it isn't built on thirds. And to an extent, I'll agree.
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#19
Quote by hollow1928years
You can usually imply it by the other chords that outline the key, and/or what is going on in the background.

^Exactly. For Example E5 ->G5 would imply an Em tonality.
Or E5 G5 A5 B5 would use these notes
E5 =E B
G5 =G D
A5 =A E
B5 =B F#
Put them in sequential order and you've got E F# G A B D E
Using these notes you get Em G B and the A is not defined but a natural C will complete the Em scale to give Am.

However you don't have to follow the rules and can play them all as Major if you want. A melody or bass line might define the Major or Minor quality so pay attention to what else is happening.
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#20
Alright, thanks guys. And no, I wanted this much in-depth. I troll the forums a lot, so I'm not completely lost. I do have another question, however. If you were to omit the 5th from a chord, how would you distinguish it as a m7b5 from just a dominant chord?
#21
^^you can't omit the 5th in a m7b5. it would simply become a m7 without a 5th. the chord itself requires a b5 to exist.

EDIT: i suppose you could omit the b5th from the guitar chord and then emphasize it using another voice (guitar, keys, voice).
#22
Quote by sisuphi
^^you can't omit the 5th in a m7b5. it would simply become a m7 without a 5th. the chord itself requires a b5 to exist.

EDIT: i suppose you could omit the b5th from the guitar chord and then emphasize it using another voice (guitar, keys, voice).


With that type of chord yes, although with other chords where the 5th is not altered, you can get away with omitting the 5th because it has such a strong / stable relationship with the root, that it's often heard as an extension of the root anyway.