#2
Standard tuning down a semitone. If you have a chromatic tuner, tune to D# G# C# F# A# D#.
#3
if you dont have a tuner tune your A string to the 4th fret of your E string and tune the rest to that
incubus rocks my world
#6
Quote by trevorjps
o what the ****ing **** NOOB!!


+1 but you still gotta help them out...sometimes. other times just make them feel like they just did elton john in the a.ss
incubus rocks my world
#9
If you have a capo, put the capo on the first fret, and then tune your guitar normally (Assuming you know how to tune using the fret method [Which is what I call it]). Remove the capo afterwards.


Quote by trevorjps
o what the ****ing **** NOOB!!


Unfunny troll is unfunny. *Reported*
#10
Quote by pwrmax
Standard tuning down a semitone. If you have a chromatic tuner, tune to D# G# C# F# A# D#.


exactly, get some tuning device and use it to tune the strings like he said:

1: D# (or Eb)
2: A# (or Bb)
3: F# (or Gb)
4: C# (or Db)
5: G# (or Ab)
6: D# (or Eb)

I use this software to tune my guitars: http://www.aptuner.com/
#11
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
If you have a capo, put the capo on the first fret, and then tune your guitar normally (Assuming you know how to tune using the fret method [Which is what I call it]). Remove the capo afterwards.



I wouldn't do this TS. Especially if you're using an acoustic guitar.


When using a capo, it's alright to fine tune, because the capo will be slightly out of tune. It's the string angle across the nut that's the problem. Normally, the string travels parallel to the fretboard, then at the nut breaks at an angle specific to the guitar, then heads to the tuning machines. When using a capo at the first fret, you've changed the first from parallel to a pretty severe angle. Now by retuning, you are in essence creating saw's out of all the strings which will gouge out the nut slots in no time. It's far better and safer to retune to altered tunings with all the strings open and unfretted.


#13
Quote by trevorjps
o what the ****ing **** NOOB!!

dude your a jerk.
seriously.
i bet you dont even know how to tune half step down
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#14
just tune your low e down a half-step and tune all the other strings as you normally would, just, in conjunction with newly lowered e.
make sense?
just tune the low e down a half-step and do the octave 5th fret check that you normally do with standard tuning with the other strings.
yeah, I think that makes sense.
#15
Quote by confusius
I wouldn't do this TS. Especially if you're using an acoustic guitar.


When using a capo, it's alright to fine tune, because the capo will be slightly out of tune. It's the string angle across the nut that's the problem. Normally, the string travels parallel to the fretboard, then at the nut breaks at an angle specific to the guitar, then heads to the tuning machines. When using a capo at the first fret, you've changed the first from parallel to a pretty severe angle. Now by retuning, you are in essence creating saw's out of all the strings which will gouge out the nut slots in no time. It's far better and safer to retune to altered tunings with all the strings open and unfretted.




Barring the strings would also work, and won't jack up your nut. Of course, you'll have to have some boss finger strength to barre long enough to do this
#16
Barring the strings also produces an angle. The best method is to tune with all strings open with a tuner or like so:

A string is tuned to fret 4 low E.
Fret five low E is tuned to the open A.
D string = fret 5 A string
G string = fret 5 D string
B string = fret 4 G string
E string = fret 5 B string


I think that's right.