#1


That's my Seagull Grand that I just bought today.

The sound is amazing(!) compared to what I've been previously playing, the body is a perfect fit for me... but the neck is FAT comparatively also. That was a problem I hadn't even considered at the time.

My hands are tiny even by female standards, but I'm sure I can make do.

The question here is... my capo. For some reason I can't get it properly past the 6th fret or so. I've had it since I started playing (a little under a year now) so I know it's been stretched out.

I don't want to buy another capo (aren't they one size fits all?)-- surely there's something I can do.
#2
You will have to buy a new one apparently. Then again, acoustic neck ARE wider than electrics.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#3
Quote by evening_crow
You will have to buy a new one apparently. Then again, acoustic neck ARE wider than electrics.


I've been playing an acoustic-electric Epiphone and I suppose I just assumed the Seagull would be the same. Meh. I guess a new capo is in the works.

Thanks for the quick reply.
#4
People have no idea how good these small bodied guitars are. They are all obsessed with dreadnoughts. I have a small bodied blues guitar that nothing larger can even touch for tone. Get a capo especialy designed for classicals and you should have no problems. Wow, what great looking guitar. It will sit in your lap like a baby!
#5
It depends on the neck size , I have 7 or 8 capos
I have 4 x G7th capos 1 for banjo 1 for nylon or 12 string & 2 for steel

The first pic is of one of my G7th steel capos
the 2nd is of some other various capos







Hope it helps

Oh if you can afford the G7th they are fantastic. Approx $65 AUD


I'm with Akabilk with smaller bodied guitars delivering the goods!!

Pic is my baby well her I.D. lable anyway , didnt want to get too off topic.

Richard

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Head Drug Tester of Australians FTWclub
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Last edited by Dix_Fix at Jul 31, 2008,
#6
Quote by musclebonesinew

The question here is... my capo. For some reason I can't get it properly past the 6th fret or so. I've had it since I started playing (a little under a year now) so I know it's been stretched out.

I don't want to buy another capo (aren't they one size fits all?)-- surely there's something I can do.


Unfortunately, no, capo's are not one size fit's all. Thus the reason companies like G7th makes so many different sizes. Do yourself a favor and bite the bullet and buy a new one. I know you spent a fair penny on that guitar(gorgeous by the way), so why not treat her right to a brand new capo that fits her like a glove? You won't regret it.
#7
Quote by LeftyDave
Unfortunately, no, capo's are not one size fit's all. Thus the reason companies like G7th makes so many different sizes. Do yourself a favor and bite the bullet and buy a new one. I know you spent a fair penny on that guitar(gorgeous by the way), so why not treat her right to a brand new capo that fits her like a glove? You won't regret it.


Agreed. Get a new one. My normal dunlop snap capo works on my Seagull up to about the 7th fret. I have to REALLY crank that sucker open to get it on there though. A classical capo may fit much better.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
NO!!

Don't get a classical capo!

The fretboard is different, and it won't work.

Just get a larger capo, mate.

They don't think it be like it is, but it do.
#9
^ Der, a clasical capo is larger, er, mate. If she goes with the G7th brand, a classical sized capo might hang over the edge of the fretboard too much, but they will have one to fit either way. It would still work tho, so just calm down a little there buddy, alrighty then.
#10
ok sorry for the threadhijack, but something ive been wondering but dont feel its worth making a new topic for:

Is it bad to leave your capo on your guitar? Like overnight or something after you've been using it?
#11
Quote by LeftyDave
^ Der, a clasical capo is larger, er, mate. If she goes with the G7th brand, a classical sized capo might hang over the edge of the fretboard too much, but they will have one to fit either way. It would still work tho, so just calm down a little there buddy, alrighty then.


that's true. The standard classical guitar nut width is about 2 inches. The average seagull is 1.8 inches.

The classical guitar also has a non-radiused neck. So i can see why the above poster would think it wouldnt work. However, my brother uses his steel string(radiused) capo on his classical and it works just fine. However, the radius of most acoustic guitars aren't that large(unlike a telecaster, haha). A classical capo would probably still work.

EDIT: to answer the above poster... No, there shouldn't be any adverse effects on your guitar. The most it will do is pull your guitar out of tune, which is quite probable.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
Last edited by captivate at Jul 31, 2008,
#12
Quote by StonaLemons
ok sorry for the threadhijack, but something ive been wondering but dont feel its worth making a new topic for:

Is it bad to leave your capo on your guitar? Like overnight or something after you've been using it?


You can, but it's not recommended. It could kink the strings up a little if left on too long. It will more than likely throw the guitar out of tune as Captivate said. Do what you want, but I wouldn't. If you're worried about losing or misplacing the capo, just clip it onto the headstock between the D and G string tuning posts, or if you have 6 in a row tuners, clip it on to the headstock just behind the nut(under the strings of course). The rubber pads on the capo will prevent any harm done to the wood and finish of the headstock.
#13
Quote by StonaLemons
ok sorry for the threadhijack, but something ive been wondering but dont feel its worth making a new topic for:

Is it bad to leave your capo on your guitar? Like overnight or something after you've been using it?



It's not a good idea to leave a capo on when not playing. The constant pressure from the strings onto the fret the capo is behind speeds up fret wear heaps! It's easy to spot a guitar that has had a lot of capo use. The first 7 frets [especially the 2nd fret] all have string grooves in them. Useualy from a capo, not heaps of playing.
So best to take capo off when not in use.

Re-fretting isn't cheap.
#14
Quote by Akabilk
It's not a good idea to leave a capo on when not playing. The constant pressure from the strings onto the fret the capo is behind speeds up fret wear heaps! It's easy to spot a guitar that has had a lot of capo use. The first 7 frets [especially the 2nd fret] all have string grooves in them. Useualy from a capo, not heaps of playing.
So best to take capo off when not in use.

Re-fretting isn't cheap.


It's especially expensive if you have binding on the side too if im not mistaken.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.