#1
As maybe some of you knows, I had to replace my cheap plastic nut because it was "nuts".

I got a bone one becuz my guitar tech actualy said that it was better than a graphite one.

And it actually works very nicely. My guitar never detunes now. My plastic nut was ****ed up.

But I always see ppl talking about how good is a graph nut.

But my guitar tech said* a bone nut is better and started explaining me some things. I actualy trust him caus he's the guitar tech of my teacher and he has been doing this things for over 30years.

So what do you guys think? bone nut > graph nut?

ps: don't flame me for that stupid nut joke pl0x
Last edited by kevC4 at Jul 31, 2008,
#2
Hmm... I'm not completely sure but i thought graphite nuts (hahaha!) help you stay in tune better but bone ones give some better sustain and tone lightly.

Like i said, i'm not completely sure about this but i believe that's what i've heard ppl mention.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#3
Warmoth explains it quite well here: http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/necks/necks.cfm?fuseaction=stringnut

and i do trust that they're right.
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#4
Graphite nuts are better if you're often doing big bends, usually with a tremolo bridge of some kind. They have a duller tone though (not 'warmer' - duller).

Bone nuts are better if you're just playing regularly, perhaps with some bending but no big dive bombs or anything like that. They have a more dynamic tone (again, not 'brighter' - dynamic).

Then there's roller nuts, these give a duller, less dynamic tone, and a brighter tone also, and are the absolute best in tuning stability for tremolo bridges that aren't locking Floyd Rose types.
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#5
Bone nuts are more traditional material. In something like a LP work great. But they dont do so well in guitars with wammies. Somebody whos been doing things the same way for 30 years or more isnt going to warm up to new ideas so easy. Hes always used bone nuts and always will probably even if its not the best choice.
#6
my luthier told me the same
he thinks graphite is ok for shreding and for lead guitar overall because it gives you nice sustain. but bone nuts have a fuller sound
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#7
Quote by Tackleberry
Bone nuts are more traditional material. In something like a LP work great. But they dont do so well in guitars with wammies. Somebody whos been doing things the same way for 30 years or more isnt going to warm up to new ideas so easy. Hes always used bone nuts and always will probably even if its not the best choice.


Well he does install graphite nut but he had problems with those.

I remember that he said graph nut was good but after 3 years they go boom.

Well I'm using my whammy bar with my nut bone and it works fine, though I don't use it alot but I bend alot.
#8
Quote by evening_crow
Hmm... I'm not completely sure but i thought graphite nuts (hahaha!) help you stay in tune better but bone ones give some better sustain and tone lightly.

Like i said, i'm not completely sure about this but i believe that's what i've heard ppl mention.


In my opinion, I think the whole "brass/bone nut gives you more sustain" thing is a load of nonsense. In theory it sounds good, but in practice, surely it would only effect open strings? As far as the strings' two contact point materials influencing the sound, the nut material is negligible, surely? I'm willing to believe the tuning stability and stuff, but sustain? On an open string, the two contact points are the nut, and the string saddle. If I fret a note- the nut is completely out of the equation. The fret takes the place of the nut as the other contact point, in addition to the bridge. Therefore, if we're going to agonize over materials, surely the bridge is far more important? In my eyes, there's a bigger sustain argument for having brass frets than a brass nut (never mind that brass frets would wear down really quickly, lol).

Tuning stability- yes. Tone and sustain? Only on open strings. So pretty irrelevant, in the scheme of things.
Last edited by Martin Scott at Jul 31, 2008,
#9
Quote by Martin Scott
In my opinion, I think the whole "brass/bone nut gives you more sustain" thing is a load of nonsense. In theory it sounds good, but in practice, surely it would only effect open strings? As far as the strings' two contact point materials influencing the sound, the nut material is negligible, surely? I'm willing to believe the tuning stability and stuff, but sustain? On an open string, the two contact points are the nut, and the string saddle. If I fret a note- the nut is completely out of the equation. The fret takes the place of the nut as the other contact point, in addition to the bridge. Therefore, if we're going to agonize over materials, surely the bridge is far more important? In my eyes, there's a bigger sustain argument for having brass frets than a brass nut (never mind that brass frets would wear down really quickly, lol).

Tuning stability- yes. Tone and sustain? Only on open strings. So pretty irrelevant, in the scheme of things.


I agree with that , except the tone. The tone still changes I believe. Maybe because of something about what contact the string has and it affects the complete string something like that.

I'm not a pro in thing like this but maybe there's still a logic in there
#10
Quote by kevC4
I agree with that , except the tone. The tone still changes I believe. Maybe because of something about what contact the string has and it affects the complete string something like that.

I'm not a pro in thing like this but maybe there's still a logic in there


Nah it wouldn't. Same thing with sustain- it'd only effect open strings. If you fret a note, you're completely cutting the nut out of the tone/sustain equation for that string. The nut has no influence on the vibration of the string from the fret, and the bridge saddle.