#1
When your soloing it obviously helps to know your scales, but what I don't know how to do is know which scale(s) to use for a song. I kinda got the hang of pentatonic scales, knowing if the key is in X then you find the base note of the scale in note X and improvise from there, then i got into the idea of linking the 5(if that's right?) different pentatonic patterns together

But as I haven't had guitar lessons for about 2 years now (been playing around 5-6) I've forgot most of the soling techniques I learnt and when I improvise now I just kinda guess which note comes next and most of the time I get it right, just from.....instinct :s if that makes sense.

I wanna get back learning scales (boring...but useful, I know) to improve finding my way around the fret board, but what confuses me is


How do I know which scale to use if I want to just improvise on the spot? should I use Pentatonic....Ionian....Dorian? Thanks :-)
#2
Quit worrying about the scales and use your ears. Get emotional and solo your heart out.
#3
Quote by PanHead
Quit worrying about the scales and use your ears. Get emotional and solo your heart out.



Ignore him. Learning scales doesn't inhibit you musically in anyway. It can only help. Learn how to use the Major scale properly. Learn what it is, how to use it, how to create harmony, how to play it, how to recognize it, and then move on to modes when you have all of that down.
#4
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
Ignore him. Learning scales doesn't inhibit you musically in anyway. It can only help. Learn how to use the Major scale properly. Learn what it is, how to use it, how to create harmony, how to play it, how to recognize it, and then move on to modes when you have all of that down.


Baloney, it can help but it can hinder.
#5
Quote by PanHead
Baloney, it can help but it can hinder.

No, it can't.
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#7
Quote by PanHead
Quit worrying about the scales and use your ears. Get emotional and solo your heart out.


You need to know how to play before you can play with feeling.

I usually choose a scale based on the songs structure and progression.
#8
Quote by PanHead
Baloney, it can help but it can hinder.


Proper theory should let you know what your ears will later confirm. It hinders people when they learn a scale without understanding it and then just go up and down the scale.

Knowing theory well is never a hinderence. It just tells you what you will inevitably learn by just using your ears a hell of a let quicker.
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+1
#9
All true guys but fixations on scales is too much. Work with keys and chords since chords are practically everything and scales are part of 'em. You should let the chords provide the frameworks such as progressions and voicing (rhythm) and that's the TS's problem. He can't decide what scales to use if he doesn't know what chords it's going to be played under.

Once you know what's the progression is then you can improvise with the scales. Now the scales are a set of notes that fit the key and there's a set that's not in the scale. Each note has a certain degrees of tensions (desires to resolve) to the key.

Concentrating on the scales may mean you're missing those notes because there's a lots of colors in them and your ears have to come in to groove on 'em.
#10
its not that i want to be able to only improvise only using scales, i just want to be able to confirm what my head/ears say, and to know that the note im about to fret will work well, and not sound awful

any tips on that?

Thanks for all the replies so far :-)
#11
Scales are a part of chords just as much as chords are a part of scales - they're really the same thing, just presented differently.
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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Scales are a part of chords just as much as chords are a part of scales - they're really the same thing, just presented differently.


Way I see it is that scales as parts of chords is music and chords as parts of scales are theory.

Theory is good for analyzing songs and take 'em apart. See what makes 'em tick. Theory as learning tools are limited and why I said a hindrance as you can get stuck in the groove. That's where your ears are badly needed.

Lots of pros don't know a thing about theory, it's all ears and those that used theory probably needed it and should be behind 'em then.

So here I am yelling EARS! so sorry 'bout that.

Really, once in a while forget theory and just play your guitar. If you play something bad your ears will tell you. You'll learn something about intervals there.

Pretend you're a rock star and get in that guitar. You'll get there.