#1
Alright, lemme just start off by saying that I LOVE Iron Maiden. There, I got that out of my system and sets up my questions.

1) Does anyone know what kind of tricks Dave Murray uses, as in what kind of scales (if any)?

2) What is an easy way to identify if a scale is indeed being used by looking at the music? Is it really just as easy as looking at the notes and then matching them up with a certain scale in a certain key?

And finally, 3) From like TAB music or even stuff in Guitar Pro, how can you tell a key signature? Just find all the accidentals and put em together? (I'm a choir kid, so I'm used to being able to look at the far left of the staff and see what key it's in, and I know not all music is in C Major or A minor.)

And just for fun - Even though his solos are amazing, why does it always sound like Janick Gers just plays 3 notes really fast?

Thanks! (And if the formatting on this comes out wonky - I'm posting from a Blackberry Curve)
#2
1) Dave Murrray tends to play with a lot of legato (hammer-ons and pull-offs) technique. Most of his solos are based in the Aeolian mode (the natural minor scale).

2) Like I said, most Iron Maiden stuff uses the natural minor scale (particularily Murray's parts). Just find the key that the song is in, spell out that major scale, and check to see if it follows what Murray is useing.

3) Ah... Alas. One of the many reason's I dislike TAB. One way you could figure out the key is to analyze the chord progression and find the root. Another easier way is, in Guitar Pro, find the option that lets you add standard notation to the tab (though I'm not sure if this will give you a correct key signature, it will be easier to spell out the scale.

Finally, an Adrian Smith (guitarist before Janick Gers) trademark was the fast repeditive three or four note groups. My guess is Janick Gers just tried to maintain that style.
#3
2). Yes. If you know that the piece is in E minor and in the solo you see that there's a D# instead of D then you know that the solo goes to E Harmonic Minor. Another example: If a piece is in C major but for some certain section you see F# instead of F then you know it went to C Lydian for a bit.

3). https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=919073
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#4
A lot of GP music doesn't include a key signature, and I do use the standard notation to get the rhythmic feel and general direction of the notes or whatever. That's why I asked if I could just take all the accidentals and line them up and hopefully spell out a key signature

Thank you so much though!
#5
Quote by Idiosyncracy
A lot of GP music doesn't include a key signature, and I do use the standard notation to get the rhythmic feel and general direction of the notes or whatever. That's why I asked if I could just take all the accidentals and line them up and hopefully spell out a key signature

Thank you so much though!

That's what the link was for.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#6
Quote by metal4all
That's what the link was for.


Yeah, I posted that in response to the first response, and then looked down and saw yours lol
#7
Ok, so I'm trying to learn Fear of the Dark in it's entirety (I know most of it except for the solos).

I'm looking at a Guitar Pro version of the song, and in the verses/chorus, the only accidental is an Asharp, which isn't alone in any key signature that I'm familiar with.

If you move to the solo, it looks like the key is A major or Fsharp minor because of the amount of Fsharp, Gsharp, and Gsharp notes, with the occasional Dsharp accidental.

This is where I keep getting confused :\
#8
The A# would just be an accidental and doesn't affect the key signature.

If it has a bunch of F#'s, G#'s, and C#'s it's probably A major or F# minor.


You also have to take into account the tonal center. What note does the song revolve around? Where does it resolve? If the song always wants to move to the note, A, it's probably in A major.


Great song btw. I don't know how to play it but I'm a huge Maiden fan. Dave Murray and Adrian Smith are gods.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
Personally I prefer Murray/Gers :P Smith seems a bit sloppy sometimes, even though he plays with a lot of spirit.

Well if you put it that way, then I guess it would actually be A major because it seems the root chord (simply a power chord without the top octave) is just D/A
#10
I just looked through the tab. It looks like it's in D minor. The note D looks a LOT like the tonal center. The note Bb is everywhere. There's F naturals and C naturals everywhere. The second solo looks like it goes to D major but the song goes back to D minor. It also resolves to D (D5).


Edit: Janick is pretty cool too. I like Adrian's kinda sloppy playing. It's kinda like Marty Friedman (another guitar god).

Edit2: Don't be discouraged about finding out the key. It takes a lot of practice. Hell, I'm not good at it. It's sometimes tough to spot when chords are borrowed from another key and what chords are in the actual key and when there's a modulation (key change). It just takes practice.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Jul 31, 2008,
#11
Quote by metal4all
I just looked through the tab. It looks like it's in D minor. The note D looks a LOT like the tonal center. The note Bb is everywhere. There's F naturals and C naturals everywhere. The second solo looks like it goes to D major but the song goes back to D minor. It also resolves to D (D5).


I was about to question your sanity before my brain started working, and I remembered that A# and Bb are the same freaking note XD

So would the G#'s in the solos just be accidentals?
#12
Solos usually change things up a bit. If you look at the rhythm you see that it's still in D minor. In the second solo you'll see F# coming up though. F# is the major 3rd of D. That means that it goes to D major there for a bit (probably to show a difference in the two solos. and it sounds good before going to the "fear of the daaaaaaaaaarrrrrk" dealie.) It still resolves around the tonal center, D, just gives a different sound to it.

So yeah, solos usually change things up a little bit like my personal favorite thing to do, play harmonic minor over something in natural minor.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#14
No problem man. You're very welcome. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. The desire to learn is enough reason to receive help.


Now I have that "dun na ni ni ni ni, dun na ni ni ni ni, dun na ni ni ni ni, dun na nuh ni neh ni" (1:43 - 2:02) riff stuck in my head. It's one of my favorite riffs of all time.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥