#1
Hey!

In the chat thread, I posted asking if there was a simpler way to write alternating time sigs of 4/4 and 6/16, and was told that it depends on the pulses. What does that mean exactly (pulses)?


EDIT: More questions!

On musictheory.net, the lessons say that a time sig in simple meter will always have a 2, 3, or 4 on top. Why wouldn't 5/4 work? You can split all five of those beats into eighth notes.

It also says that 8/8 contains two compound beats and one simple beat. In the lesson, they group it like this
But why is it grouped 3 3 2? Couldn't it be grouped 4 4? Couldn't it also be written with four quarter notes too?
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Jul 31, 2008,
#2
Basically, there are many ways to write the same thing. Um, I think different time signatures give a different feel because they fit more or less into a measure but technically, you can write the same thing in every time signature and argue that, "Can't that be written in ___ time?" Just a different way to do it, that's all... (if that's what you're asking... lol)
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#3
Ok, nvm. Scratch those last two questions Thanks.

I still don't get the first question though. If it helps any, the bar of 4/4 has all quarter notes and the bar of 6/16 has two dotted eighths.
#4
Well, by "pulse" I mean the perceived beats. In 6/8 time, you have 6 eighth notes per bar, but there are three eighth notes per pulse. In time signatures like 7/8, you can have pulses of different lengths; one might be 3 eighths, or two. So, you could have 3-2-2 as your pulse pattern, or perhaps 2-2-3.

In your case, you could possibly have different pulses that would require different groupings. However, you seem to have 4 quarter notes, followed by 6 16th notes where the pulses are the length of 3 16th notes. While you could write this as 22/16 with a grouping pattern of 4-4-4-4-3-3, alternating 4/4 and 6/16 is probably the easiest to understand.


I hope I'm not too confusing with this. If you have any questions, just post back
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#5
Cool, thanks

Now I just need to find drum machine software (free lol) that will count beats in something other than quarters!
#7
I was looking for something a bit more realistic sounding. Right now, I use Acoustica Beatcraft, but I can't seem to find a way to get it to count time sigs that don't have the beats as quarter notes.
#8
Basically the reason why you write things one way and not the other is because you have to clearly show the specific beats within the measure. Hopefully bangoodcharolette or someone else can explain that more fully but i'm pretty sure thats why.
#9
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
I was looking for something a bit more realistic sounding. Right now, I use Acoustica Beatcraft, but I can't seem to find a way to get it to count time sigs that don't have the beats as quarter notes.


Change the amount of beats in a measure to like 6 or something so you can put stuff in 3/4. You can also do triplets with beatcraft, I'm pretty sure (only up to 8th note though).
#10
In the same song, there is a part in 8/8. It fits fine in 4/4, but the drums aren't playing the straight kick-snare-kick-snare. I want to show the compound and simple beats. Is it correct to write it as 8/8 in that situation?

^What about for 6/16? It doesn't take up the whole bar in terms of how beatcraft counts it (quarters).
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Jul 31, 2008,
#11
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
In the same song, there is a part in 8/8. It fits fine in 4/4, but the drums aren't playing the straight kick-snare-kick-snare. I want to show the compound and simple beats. Is it correct to write it as 8/8 in that situation?


Hmmm... I'm not really sure. Is there any necessity of putting it in 8/8? If it works fine in 4/4 and everything is expressed the same way, you really don't have to. I wouldn't know the theory behind it, though.

Quote by kirbyrocknroll

^What about for 6/16? It doesn't take up the whole bar in terms of how beatcraft counts it (quarters).


Well, since 4 sixteenths are a quarter note, try putting 1.5 beats in a measure. I think it works, but I haven't used beatcraft in a long, long time.
#12
^ 8/8 has different beats. 8/8 has two compound beats and a simple beat (at least here), and 4/4 has 4 simple beats, I think.

Thanks for the 1.5 suggestion! Sadly, it didn't work. There have to be at least 2 beats, so I tried 5.5, but it just rounded off to 5. Ah well! Maybe writing it as one long measure until it goes back to landing on the first beat won't hurt, as far as programming the beats go.