#1
So I'm trying to change my strings, and the peg on the high E string keeps popping out. I then hold it down and continue with the changing, but it still pops out.

This has happened to me last time, but it stopped and I could continue with the rest of my guitar. What do I do?
LARGE TEXT
#2
How are you feeding the ball into the guitar? It makes a big difference. If you feed it in improperly, the ball will not want to lock.

if you're looking straight down at the top face of the guitar, the ball should look like this || when you feed it in... as opposed to the circle of the ball facing up like this O

Also, remember to never try to force the pin into the bridge. That can cause some damage to your guitar. I used to have the same problem until I figured out how to do it and I remember how frustrated I used to be. So just a heads up on that.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#3
Here's what you gotta do: Hold down the peg lightly, pull on the string until it's in its final position, move your fingers and find a hammer.


Now take that hammer and pound in the peg as hard as you possibly can. Until your fingers are bleeding from the vibration of the hammer. That should do the trick.

-----
I've been warned because I'm a prick.

roamingedit@5:41PM EST 31 Jul 08
-----

Apparently someone doesn't have a sense of humor. How sad.


-----
I've been banned because I'm a prick and a smart ass.

jimedit@12:46PM CST 01 Aug 08
-----
Last edited by Ekofu at Jul 31, 2008,
#4
^ You brought it on yourself, buddy.

Quote by captivate
How are you feeding the ball into the guitar? It makes a big difference. If you feed it in improperly, the ball will not want to lock.

if you're looking straight down at the top face of the guitar, the ball should look like this || when you feed it in... as opposed to the circle of the ball facing up like this O

Also, remember to never try to force the pin into the bridge. That can cause some damage to your guitar. I used to have the same problem until I figured out how to do it and I remember how frustrated I used to be. So just a heads up on that.

Thanks dude, it works. I guess the hundreds of times I've changed my strings I've luckily put the ball end in right till today.
LARGE TEXT
#5
I don't think it's so much the orientation of the ball that matters as it's position relative to the tip of the bridge pin. See, properly installed, the ball end of the string will not be resting on the tip of the pin, but along side the pin, and up against the bottom of the bridge plate. If by chance you had the ball resting on the tip of the pin, whenever you applied tension to that string the ball would pull the string and pin up and out of the bridge. Quick fix: bend a slight angle into the end of the string about 1/8-1/4 inch away from the ball. Feed the string down into the hole in the bridge, slide the pin in next with the string in the slot of the pin and the slot facing dead on at the headstock, then pull up on the string as you press down on the pin. That's it. Give a tug on the string and it should already be firmly set in place. Here's a pic of where the ball ends are supposed to sit in a correctly strung acoustic:



Ignore the nickel and hand bit. Notice that the silver ball ends are off to the side of the pins, and up tight to the bridge plate. That positioning causes a lock to form as the ball tries to pull up out of the hole, but it can't because the pin is in the way, so it wedges itself in that position. Ingenius invention, and as old as the hills.
BTW, to break this lock, simply push the string into the guitar a little from the outside(string detached from the tuning post). Lift the pin out of the hole, then out comes the string. Nice and easy. And no need to fight with anything once you know how it all works.
Last edited by LeftyDave at Jul 31, 2008,
#6
^Thats what I usually do. Although getting it out agian is a totally different matter. I usually have a bit of a struggle.

I often find that some strings are easier to put in then others,some take a good prodding to go into the hole, others like to come out easily...
Quote by Renka
OddOneOut is an Essex S&M mistress and not a pirate or a computer program.

#7
A good trick is before you put the end of the string into the peg hole, put a slight kink into the end of the string right up against the the brass ball. Insert the string with the kink facing up the guitar.

Also, if you ever have your strings off for more than a day, loosen off the truss-rod [counter-clockwise] so there is no stress on the neck, or you might end up with a permanent backward bow in the neck that the truss-rod can't correct properly. Why? Because with all the string off, the truss-rod that is normally countering 200lbs of string tension is suddenly applying 200lbs of pull back on the neck because there is no strings to counter the pressure!

Go here for any guitar set up problems etc. and how to do things like professionally re-string and how to do it right at the peg heads too [a lot of experienced guitarists still do it in the least efficient way ...ever notice how quickly a Pro. performer can change a string without one of those stupid winders?], easily remove stubborn pins and lots of other things from a professional Luthier:

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html

Also, avoid wooden saddle pins [they look nice but..] they often swell and can be a real bugger to remove and sometimes have to be drilled out!
Last edited by Akabilk at Jul 31, 2008,
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
I don't think it's so much the orientation of the ball that matters as it's position relative to the tip of the bridge pin. See, properly installed, the ball end of the string will not be resting on the tip of the pin, but along side the pin, and up against the bottom of the bridge plate. If by chance you had the ball resting on the tip of the pin, whenever you applied tension to that string the ball would pull the string and pin up and out of the bridge. Quick fix: bend a slight angle into the end of the string about 1/8-1/4 inch away from the ball. Feed the string down into the hole in the bridge, slide the pin in next with the string in the slot of the pin and the slot facing dead on at the headstock, then pull up on the string as you press down on the pin. That's it. Give a tug on the string and it should already be firmly set in place. Here's a pic of where the ball ends are supposed to sit in a correctly strung acoustic:



Ignore the nickel and hand bit. Notice that the silver ball ends are off to the side of the pins, and up tight to the bridge plate. That positioning causes a lock to form as the ball tries to pull up out of the hole, but it can't because the pin is in the way, so it wedges itself in that position. Ingenius invention, and as old as the hills.
BTW, to break this lock, simply push the string into the guitar a little from the outside(string detached from the tuning post). Lift the pin out of the hole, then out comes the string. Nice and easy. And no need to fight with anything once you know how it all works.


Mmm... I see your point. From personal experience, however, the pin has never slipped out when I do it the way I explained above. Strings changing used to piss me off a lot until i started doing it that way because the pin always slipped back up. Iunno, might just be me then, haha.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
Put a small kink in the end of the strings and the pins will never slip back up.