#1
Hey guys, I've been wanting to experiment with an Indian sound, which scale is appropriate with that style that is similar to classical sitar playing. It's hard to describe anything more specific than that, so interpret as you must.
#3
Harmonic Minor is a good one.


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#6
Quote by beadhangingOne
there is actually a "hindu" scale I believe. Phyrgian dominant with a raised 7th is very common in indian music as well.



Wouldn't that make it just a regular Phrygian scale then?
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#7
Quote by VoodooCow229
Wouldn't that make it just a regular Phrygian scale then?


Errr no. Phyrgian mode has a minor 3rd as opposed to a major 3rd in phyrgian dominant. That is the only difference.

When I said "phyrgian dominant with a raised 7th", think Misirlou.
#8
No, Phrygian dominant has a major third. That is only difference. Normally, phrygian does not have a major seventh.

Edit: beaten
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#9
Quote by sharpiemarker
No, Phrygian dominant has a major third. That is only difference. Normally, phrygian does not have a major seventh.

Edit: beaten



Brilliant!
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I give up.

#11
The proper phrasing and instrument tone scale.

Kidding

But in all honesty, do any of you suggesting scales realise that indian classical music uses mostly the same modes as western music?
Alo, indinan classical music has been evolving for over 2000 years. Whilst western music sort of began in the 14th century with the gregorian monks and such, we've only had what, 600 years to develop our music? So indian classical music is alot more complex than western music.
With any style of music, you cant say, if I use this scale I will sound like X. No, music is more complicated than that. Sure theres a mode called "hindu" for some strange reason, but just because you use that scale doesnt mean you'll sound "hindu" (inb4, how he hell do you sound like a religion)

You've also got to realise that indian culture is ridiculously diverse. What the people of the north play is different to what the people of the south play. And than you got a ridiculous caste system, so the poor people would listen and play different music than the rich people.

If you want to sound "indian," look for some translations of some classical indian textbooks.
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#12
I studied "Hindusthan music" up to "Madyama" level, if you know what I mean,lol.

Here's the scale for a beautiful Rag known as "Bhimapalasi"


Ascending(Arohana)-
Bb(lower) C Eb F G Bb C(upper)

Descending(Awarohana)-
C(upper) Bb A G F Eb D C(lower)

But there's something called "Mukyanga(Pakad)" which shows the characteristics of a Rag, and this is the Pakad for this rag(I think this is what you want)-

Bb(lower).... C..... , F.... , Eb F G Eb.... , F... Eb.... , D.... C.....
If you want that real sound you have to slide some notes. When you play Bb, slide to it from C, and for Eb slide from F.

Sorry, I can't name a scale for this coz it varies from ascending to descending.

I hope this helped!
Last edited by YA89 at Aug 1, 2008,
#13
Have you heard of a guy named Vishwa Mohan Bhatt? He's on the first Crossroads Festival DVD.
#14
to put it very simply, there are five scales that are used very often and interspersed with each other:
harmonic minor
mixolydian without the 2nd (thats right, neither the minor 2nd nor the major 2nd)
dorian (slightly infrequent)
1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 (this scale has many names, so i wont bother)
and also 1 2 b3 b4 5 6 b7 (i dont think this one has a name)

a typical southern indian piece of music may start in A natural minor, move on to A mixolydian, come back to harmonic minor and then use the other three scales i mentioned in any order, and end in harmonic minor.
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#15
Quote by dancesisidance
Harmonic Minor is a good one.

agreed
i love the harmonic minor
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#16
Quote by demonofthenight
The proper phrasing and instrument tone scale.

Kidding

But in all honesty, do any of you suggesting scales realise that indian classical music uses mostly the same modes as western music?
Alo, indinan classical music has been evolving for over 2000 years. Whilst western music sort of began in the 14th century with the gregorian monks and such, we've only had what, 600 years to develop our music? So indian classical music is alot more complex than western music.
With any style of music, you cant say, if I use this scale I will sound like X. No, music is more complicated than that. Sure theres a mode called "hindu" for some strange reason, but just because you use that scale doesnt mean you'll sound "hindu" (inb4, how he hell do you sound like a religion)

You've also got to realise that indian culture is ridiculously diverse. What the people of the north play is different to what the people of the south play. And than you got a ridiculous caste system, so the poor people would listen and play different music than the rich people.

If you want to sound "indian," look for some translations of some classical indian textbooks.


I'm sorry but I have to disagree 100%.


Western Music is complex too.

To sound Indian, text books will be of little help. I would suggest listening to authentic classical music to study how the notes are approached. You merely imititate the notes. The thing with Indian music is, scales have different personalites called ragas. There are rules to playing notes of a scale, which are easy to learn. By rules I refer to ways of sliding/vibrato. Once you play a scale like a raga, that is play the notes of the scale in the personality of a raga which is bending the notes or sliding in a certain way, you get the raga.

A mandolin player named U Srinivas adopted Indian Classical playing. His approach is the most efficient. Youtube him.
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#17
Quote by pavan
I'm sorry but I have to disagree 100%.


Western Music is complex too.

To sound Indian, text books will be of little help. I would suggest listening to authentic classical music to study how the notes are approached. You merely imititate the notes. The thing with Indian music is, scales have different personalites called ragas. There are rules to playing notes of a scale, which are easy to learn. By rules I refer to ways of sliding/vibrato. Once you play a scale like a raga, that is play the notes of the scale in the personality of a raga which is bending the notes or sliding in a certain way, you get the raga.

A mandolin player named U Srinivas adopted Indian Classical playing. His approach is the most efficient. Youtube him.


Western and Indian music are both complex in different ways. Indian music is based on melody. You don't harmonize or even play two different notes at the same time.
But western music is complex because of harmonizing.

So when it comes to melody I have to say that Indian music is more complex than western music. And the timing is also complex.

And you made a wrong fact, you should never use vibrato, it was completely prohibited in all the practical exams which I went through.
Last edited by YA89 at Aug 2, 2008,
#18
I believe that in some Indian music they drone the root and the fifth and improvise with the different scales or ragas(I'm not really sure what the name is) over them.
#19
Quote by YA89


And you made a wrong fact, you should never use vibrato, it was completely prohibited in all the practical exams which I went through.


The vibrato term I used to refer to gamakas. But then what else is controlled bending, like how some notes are played on the veena.

Quote by confusius


I believe that in some Indian music they drone the root and the fifth and improvise with the different scales or ragas(I'm not really sure what the name is) over them.



true
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#21
I wouldnt mind knowing more about indian classical as well.

All I've found is some wiki articles saying that indian classical uses the same modes as western music (with different names).
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[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#22
my teacher told us about some scale type things called ragas. you might wanna research some of those (there are a lot!)
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#23
There are hundreds of indian scales. The Western ones are there somewhere too by different names. While getting a book or something may be a bit helpful and get you started, it's better to try to experiment and try to figure stuff out yourself.
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