#1
As a bassist I know certain songs just fit better with root notes, but then there are those that have room for a little fill(I'm not sure if thats the correct word or not). How could I add in fills and what not to where I would be playing solely roots before?
#3
one way of doing things delirium touched on is making a run using the scale, like roger from less than jake does a lot. another way of doing things is making a pattern out of the notes in the chord, more like a blues pattern.
#4
Quote by bass7player21
one way of doing things delirium touched on is making a run using the scale, like roger from less than jake does a lot. another way of doing things is making a pattern out of the notes in the chord, more like a blues pattern.


The reason I didn't elaborate is to try and encourage the TS to be creative and work out fills on his ownsome as opposed to just going with the rather cliched run style fills
#5
Thanks for tryin to push my creativity(or lack there of ). The way I've been trying to create fills is by messing with a certain series of 8th notes for a while. I was just wondering if there was any like technique I should know of/ look in to, in order to improve on that skill.
#6
Learn the modes and their musical function, and the rest should come naturally! There will be a point where you hear the fill you want in your head and can immediately know where to put your fingers! All you need to do is take a little effort in learning some of the theory behind how fills work technically.

Listen for space in the song, where no other instrument or voice is filling in space. When you hear a chance, an opening, play a little fill to connect and bridge chords together. One of your jobs as a bassist is to move the song along, and keep every chord "moving". A successful fill will introduce the next idea in the song, and keep it lively and entertaining for both you and your audience!


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#7
I know what the modes are and can play them, but their musical function I don't know. Would it still be the same mode if I just moved it around on the fret board? or would it have to contain the same notes? and how would I tie it into a fill? Like play a variation of the mode when the time presented itself?
#8
If you know the modes, you will know where EVERY note from ANY chord is in every place on the fretboard.

Lets say you're playing a song in A major.

Since the Ionian mode is the "major" chord form, if you play this mode starting from A, it will contain all the notes.

The SECOND mode is the Dorian mode. Since it is the second mode, you are going to want to start on the second note of the A major scale. So, play a Dorian mode starting on the second note of the A major scale (B). All of the notes you just played are in A major, you just played them all up a note.

Now play the THIRD mode (Phrygian) on the THIRD note of the A major scale (C#). Again, all the same notes as the original A major, only you started on the third note!


As far as fills go, you know now all the notes that will "fit" in a fill. By knowing the modes, you can play the notes of any key or scale all over the fretboard. When it comes time to play a fill, choose from the notes in the scale, and find a way to "bridge" the two chords together. Modes help you find those notes quicker in relationship to other chords and keys.

In order to get out of the "root note" phase, it is also important to know the dominant tones in a scale. These notes make up the "skeleton" of the chord, and are INCREDIBLY important as a bass player, since they define the chord. These notes are the 1st (root), 3rd, and the 5th of the scale. Experiment with these chord tones in different songs to keep your bass line on the move. You can NEVER go wrong by tapping into these notes. The 6th and 7th, 9th, and 11th add some extended color to your basslines.

Now, in creating fills, it is good to start by hitting these main notes of the next chord in the progression before it plays. If you're going from E dominant (7) to A major, for instance, you could start by hitting the dominant tone of the E7 (D), and then what will be the 3rd of the A major (C#). This will create a decending line from the two chords (E, D, C#, A) that defines two chords in one fill. As a lead in, you may also want to include the B to make the fill more fluid.

Remember, it is always acceptable to play OUTSIDE of the mode or scale. If you need to go from a 4th to a 5th in a major scale, you are allowed to connect the two with a tritone (flat five). This is a little less common, but sounds great when you do it. Experiment with notes that don't seem to belong, such as minor 3rds in dominant 7 chords and tritones in minor dominant chords.

Its all about experimentation, I guess. Modes will give you an outline to fill in for yourself. You'll need to see what combinations work best in what situation. Eventually you'll have a whole arsenal of fills at your disposal to throw wherever you want.


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#9
Thank you so much for that explanation incubus SCIENCE, it helped at lot. Now I'll have a better idea of what to do with the modes, unlike before.