#1
does anybody have any good sites to start to learn jazz?
i already know most of the jazz chords, so i can skip that
Last edited by ac/guns n zep at Aug 1, 2008,
#2
Check link in my signature, there are some cool jazz lesson including complex chords, scales and licks.
#4
What jazz musicians or groups do you listen to?
known as Jeff when it really matters
#5
i already know most of the jazz chords, so i can skip that




Are you familiar enough with chord and scale construction that you can not only recognize, say, C7#5b9 when you see it, but construct it anywhere on the neck, in any inversion? Do you know its function? Do you know what to do when you see it? Do you know what kind of chord you could substitute it for?

Jazz is one of the most theoretically complex genres in Western music. There is far more to it than memorizing a few 7th chords. If you want to learn jazz, find yourself a teacher. If you're particularly self-motivated, you might teach yourself to read standard notation and pick up a few books on harmony and jazz theory (e.g. Levine's The Jazz Theory Book)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 1, 2008,
#6
When you say jazz chords, do you mean shapes or the actual chord construction? If it was the latter, you would in a way sort of know all the jazz chords.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Are you familiar enough with chord and scale construction that you can not only recognize, say, C7#5b9 when you see it, but construct it anywhere on the neck, in any inversion? Do you know its function? Do you know what to do when you see it? Do you know what kind of chord you could substitute it for?


Just to check my own knowledge and help any innocent bystanders out I'd like to give an answer to this.

7#5b9 chords are built from the 7th degree of the melodic minor scale. The chord C7#5b9 comes from Db melodic minor. A lot of times it functions as a V7 in a minor key. It's one of the possible variations of V7alt, along with 7b5, 7#5, 7b9, 7#9, 7b5#5, 7b5b9, 7b5#9, 7#5#9, 7b9#9, 7b5#5b9, 7b5#5#9, 7b5b9#9, 7#5b9#9, and 7b5#5b9#9. You could substitute C7#5b9 for Gb7#11; this is a tritone substitution and Gb7#11 also comes from Db melodic minor.

Because of the homogeneity of melodic minor you could also play any of the other chords of Db melodic minor and they could act as this C7#5b9 in the right context. However, if you were playing strictly, you could use these voicings:

e--4-------------------
B--2--2--5--9--11------
G--3--1--3--6--9-------
D--2--2--6--8--11------
A--3--1--4--7--11------
E----------------------

The first is the only voicing containing the C root; the rest contain only the 3, #5, b7, and b9. Incidentally, those intervals form chords that are enharmonic with Bbm7b5 and Dbm6, or Gb9 without a root.

That's all I've got on that subject. Arch is also right that you should really get a teacher if you want to learn jazz. If that's not economically viable, you should start transcribing as many jazz tunes as you can by ear and analyze every one of them.
known as Jeff when it really matters
Last edited by titopuente at Aug 1, 2008,
#8
7#5b9 chords are built from the 7th degree of the melodic minor scale. The chord C7#5b9 comes from Db melodic minor. A lot of times it functions as a V7 in a minor key. It's one of the possible variations of V7alt, along with 7b5, 7#5, 7b9, 7#9, 7b5#5, 7b5b9, 7b5#9, 7#5#9, 7b9#9, 7b5#5b9, 7b5#5#9, 7b5b9#9, 7#5b9#9, and 7b5#5b9#9. You could substitute C7#5b9 for Gb7#11; this is a tritone substitution and Gb7#11 also comes from Db melodic minor.

Because of the homogeneity of melodic minor you could also play any of the other chords of Db melodic minor and they could act as this C7#5b9 in the right context. However, if you were playing strictly, you could use these voicings:


All of this is correct as far as my knowledge goes. I recently bought Levine's The Jazz Theory Book, and after experimenting within jazz conventions for quite some time, I've developed a love (some might call it a sexual relationship) with altered chords, to the point that I've erased ordinary dom7 chords from my music entirely (I've always hated them anyway)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.