#1
And my left hand gets very tired very quickly. Is that normal for a beginner?
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I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

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#2
Well, you probably have some form of bad posture which is leading you to create tension which is not good for anyone.

What pieces are you playing? I might be able to recommend some studies that are good for beginners. Check out composers called Giuliani, Carcassi, Carruli, and Sor. They all have books of studies in which lots of different rhythmic forms, time sigs etc etc are used.


Onto position. Your left hand thumb must be behind the fretboard, not sticking out from above like you might do when playing electric. You're wrist must be straight, not forming any excessive angle. Your fingers should land on their tips, unless you're barring. One of the most important things, which probably concerns you due to your left hand problem is that you shouldn't have a deathlock on the neck. Hold it very softly, your hand is barely there for support and your fingers only need to press down so much so that the note sounds cleanly. Not more.

I'll try and find some decent pictures of position and post them for you.
#3
If your wanting any tabs by any chance then try out Classtabs. There are loads of classical guitar tabs there. Most of them seem difficult but sound great and even mastering only a few bars is fun.
I will shred in the end!!
#4
^^+1 to what Kyrl said.

^Great site. http://www.classtab.org/


I could recommend a couple easy songs to start with if you want. I'm horrible with classical guitar so if I could learn these songs, I'm sure you could.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#5
Thanks. I think one of the things was that I was holding on the neck a bit hard and I was also holding it too high.

thanks for the recommendations guys. I was playing bourree.

Also, does anybody know where I can download guitar pro for free?
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

Quote by Son.Of.TheViper

I love you
Last edited by Psychedelico at Aug 1, 2008,
#6
I would say you need a teacher for playing classical guitar...
I mean, if you are not familiar with etudes and such, it will be hard finding them, and even harder to determine which level they are, because even though you can play a song, you may or may not have the required technique or level to play it clean, and actually produce music as the author intended to...

A teacher would also correct your position, etc...

as confusius said, put your thumb below the neck, between the middle and ring finger, but don't press the neck too hard, since it serves for support only, and most of the time you require to move your hand up and down the fretboard several times...


Also, try not to us tabs, since sometimes an accelerare or ritenuto can make a lot of difference in a piece (and also almost all classical guitar pieces are written in standard notation)....

I think learning classical guitar kind of enhances your fret hand dexterity, and pickup hand's precision. I mean, not dexterity in the shredding way (which usually only needs one unique position for your hand), but it lets you move your fingers to different positions more rapidly, and be comfortable in somewhat akward positions, etc...
And well, it trains your pickup hand too because it is not some fingerpicking song with a set pattern of strums/arpeggios/etc, and you will have to know when to hit each string etc....
Last edited by gonzaw at Aug 1, 2008,
#7
Quote by Psychedelico
Also, does anybody know where I can download guitar pro for free?

UG does not condone illegal activities!



Keep this on the D.L.:
http://rapidshare.com/files/118207961/Guitar_Pro_v5_2_with_CD_Key.rar


edit: Gonzaw, I thought classical is usually open to interpretation?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Aug 1, 2008,
#8
Quote by metal4all
UG does not condone illegal activities!



Keep this on the D.L.:
http://rapidshare.com/files/118207961/Guitar_Pro_v5_2_with_CD_Key.rar


HEY! I have a copy already, I'm just using a different computer.
Although I did download that copy too.

Thanks.
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

Quote by Son.Of.TheViper

I love you
#9
Quote by metal4all
UG does not condone illegal activities!



Keep this on the D.L.:
http://rapidshare.com/files/118207961/Guitar_Pro_v5_2_with_CD_Key.rar


edit: Gonzaw, I thought classical is usually open to interpretation?


Well, yeah, but there is some sort of threshold in which to play..
You can't play an adagio at 220 bpm, you should take into consideration the authors intentions as much as possible, and on the other hand put your touch in it, whether in rhythm, tempo, grace notes, intensity of notes, etc...
But when you are learning, it would be better to play it as the author wanted it to (most pieces have affirmations which say what to do or musical sings, etc), so then you know how you can develop your own "touch" or whatever...

Unless you are having an arrangement or transposition or something, but that is another case...
#10
Quote by gonzaw
Well, yeah, but there is some sort of threshold in which to play..
You can't play an adagio at 220 bpm, you should take into consideration the authors intentions as much as possible, and on the other hand put your touch in it, whether in rhythm, tempo, grace notes, intensity of notes, etc...
But when you are learning, it would be better to play it as the author wanted it to (most pieces have affirmations which say what to do or musical sings, etc), so then you know how you can develop your own "touch" or whatever...

Unless you are having an arrangement or transposition or something, but that is another case...

haha.

Ohhh ok. I get what you mean. Thanks.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#11
Well, I'm really just fiddling around with it, so I don't really want to have to learn to read music just for that, but when I go to one of the local music shops I'll pick up something to try. Who's a composer that has good fun guitar pieces?
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

Quote by Son.Of.TheViper

I love you
#12
If you really really want to do it right, the best thing to do would be to learn to read and get a teacher. that way he could monitor your progress weekly and make sure you don't develop any bad habits.

Because footstools are cool - UG's Classical Guitarists