#1
Hey guys. I've just started to take up guitar, and I'm starting to learn the basics from lessons I get once a week. I'm getting a Schecter Hellraiser Avenger (lefty) within the next 2-4 weeks. I have a few questions based on what I want to do when I get my guitar.

1) I'm interested in being a rhythm guitarist in a band. Granted, I won't want to be in a band right now since I'm new. But, while I'm learning the basics, is there any important techniques I should learn that are important for being a rhythm guitarist?

2) Is a metronome important? None of my friends that are guitarists use them. My brother doesn't use a metronome, and he has been playing for about 1 year now.

3) Is there any playing style that a lefty should do differently from a righty?

4) I wanted to originally be self taught, but I am somewhat forced to take lessons for now. How long do you think an average guitarist needs to take lessons for? I get 1 lesson per week, for about 1-3 hours (times vary).

5) I'm into Slipknot, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet for My Valentine. Are there any fairly easy songs I could pick up within the next month or two?


Thanks for the help, everyone.
#2
2) Yes, metronomes are one of the most important items you will need. Your going to (or atleast you should) use it for nearly everything you do when practicing guitar.

3) People have instructors for years on end. I'd say as long as you can afford it, take lessons. If you have a good instructor you will become twice as good as you would on your own. (and I wish my lessons were 1-3 hours per week... mine are 30 minutes at $20 a lesson)
#4
1) work on open/barre chords and strumming patterns , also of course power chords and as it seems you would like to be in a more metal influenced type of band work on down picking speed/stamina to help with what youd usually be playing (also palm muting)

2) yes, metronomes are pretty damn helpful, they really help when you are learning a fast song that you have to play slowly at first to learn it then slowly speed up to full. They help with most everything you'll practice anyway.

3) dont know, i'm a righty

4) honestly, i'd like to have lessons, ive never had em but ive heard that you can learn alot from playing with other people (done that, but they were just friends) if your teacher seems to be helping you and not just throwing out crap for you to do but not really showing you how to do things, maybe find another guy or go self taught?

5) a7x - unholy confessions, i learned that song about 2 months in, i think that song would help you with your goal of being a rhythm player
"Rome wasn't built in a week"

"Yeah but when they built rome, they didnt go "hey look, there's a functional building" AND ****ING KICK IT OVER AND PISS ON THE ASHES BECAUSE THE PEASANTS WERE CRYING THAT IT WAS TOO GLORIOUS AND AWESOME."
#5
1) if you're going to be a rhythm guitarist you've to work on chords and even on powerchords for rock and metal

2) yes...metronome is really important...it will help you speeding up songs...

3) i'm lefty...i play lefty and i dont think that there are differences in playing between lefty and righty...

4) i think that lessons are very important...especially if you don't know music theory...i'm self thaught but i know music theory because i've been playing piano for 4 years...

5)don't know...but i think that slipknot can be easy...a song that can help you for polaying rhythm is "no more lies" by iron maiden...it is very easy
#6
Quote by albysauro
1) if you're going to be a rhythm guitarist you've to work on chords and even on powerchords for rock and metal

2) yes...metronome is really important...it will help you speeding up songs...

3) i'm lefty...i play lefty and i dont think that there are differences in playing between lefty and righty...

4) i think that lessons are very important...especially if you don't know music theory...i'm self thaught but i know music theory because i've been playing piano for 4 years...

5)don't know...but i think that slipknot can be easy...a song that can help you for polaying rhythm is "no more lies" by iron maiden...it is very easy



Good stuff. I'll check out that song now. Thanks a lot for the help!
#7
the reason lots of guitarist dont use metronomes is cuz they have experience and its just natural. u can always play with a drum machine on a steady beat and that works great as well.

left and right should be exactly the same except for oppositeness(duh) no different techniques.

and yes always take lessons if u can.
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#8
Quote by NSHSpolevault
the reason lots of guitarist dont use metronomes is cuz they have experience and its just natural. u can always play with a drum machine on a steady beat and that works great as well.

left and right should be exactly the same except for oppositeness(duh) no different techniques.

and yes always take lessons if u can.

+1, but it takes some time (at least a year) to get these abilities.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#9
Quote by JP Oliver
Hey guys. I've just started to take up guitar, and I'm starting to learn the basics from lessons I get once a week. I'm getting a Schecter Hellraiser Avenger (lefty) within the next 2-4 weeks. I have a few questions based on what I want to do when I get my guitar.

1) I'm interested in being a rhythm guitarist in a band. Granted, I won't want to be in a band right now since I'm new. But, while I'm learning the basics, is there any important techniques I should learn that are important for being a rhythm guitarist?

2) Is a metronome important? None of my friends that are guitarists use them. My brother doesn't use a metronome, and he has been playing for about 1 year now.

3) Is there any playing style that a lefty should do differently from a righty?

4) I wanted to originally be self taught, but I am somewhat forced to take lessons for now. How long do you think an average guitarist needs to take lessons for? I get 1 lesson per week, for about 1-3 hours (times vary).

5) I'm into Slipknot, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet for My Valentine. Are there any fairly easy songs I could pick up within the next month or two?


Thanks for the help, everyone.


Thats cool that you want to be a rhythm guitarist but you shouldnt just limit yourself to that try doing some leads in songs when you practice so you can do both for your band
#10
Quote by JP Oliver
Hey guys. I've just started to take up guitar, and I'm starting to learn the basics from lessons I get once a week. I'm getting a Schecter Hellraiser Avenger (lefty) within the next 2-4 weeks. I have a few questions based on what I want to do when I get my guitar.

1) I'm interested in being a rhythm guitarist in a band. Granted, I won't want to be in a band right now since I'm new. But, while I'm learning the basics, is there any important techniques I should learn that are important for being a rhythm guitarist?

2) Is a metronome important? None of my friends that are guitarists use them. My brother doesn't use a metronome, and he has been playing for about 1 year now.

3) Is there any playing style that a lefty should do differently from a righty?

4) I wanted to originally be self taught, but I am somewhat forced to take lessons for now. How long do you think an average guitarist needs to take lessons for? I get 1 lesson per week, for about 1-3 hours (times vary).

5) I'm into Slipknot, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet for My Valentine. Are there any fairly easy songs I could pick up within the next month or two?


Thanks for the help, everyone.


1. Palm muting, having a good grip over strumming patterns, if you're thinking about metal or punkish type music: try both down picking and alternating strums on chords,
2. Metronomes can mean the difference between someone who cares about their playing and someone that plays once a month. Okay, that was an exaggeration, but, the metronome is a time keeping device which is basically invaluable to the learning musician, passively you should be able to develop a better sense of rhythm. People that don't use metronomes tend to speed up and slow down in tempo without realizing it, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. However, if you ever plan on playing faster-paced music that requires technicality and precision, the metronome is your best friend. Try it for yourself, don't go by what everyone else seems to do.
Last edited by silvadolla at Aug 2, 2008,