#1
I've heard a lot of people tell people shopping for new guitars to try before buying. I know that there will almost always be lemons among a group of guitars. For example, take the Gibson Les Paul Studio, a guitar that is well known for widely varying in quality.
Since a "bad" Studio and a "good" Studio are made from pretty much the exact same wood, the only difference between them would be hardware and set up, so if you were to take the bad Studio, take out the crap hardware and replace it with quality hardware, and get it set up (truss rod, action, fret dress etc.) then wouldn't it be equal in quality to the good Studio? So the only difference between the two guitars would be the extra couple hundred dollars that you spent improving the bad one, correct?

I guess my point is that even if you have a lemon, is it possible to improve it to the quality of a "good" model by giving it a setup, new hardware etc?
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#2
Not necessarily, because a guitar can be a lemon because of shoddy build quality along with parts. Just because the same parts are being used to make the guitar, doesn't guarantee the end product will always turn out the same.

A good setup can rejuvenate a lame guitar, but some things like bad finishes, bad fret jobs, bad wood joints, etc... are an enormous hassle to deal with.

EDIT: +1 to the post below...
#4
i think the hardware definitely affects the sound and playability, but the overall construction of the guitar would also have its effects. perhaps the more expensive ones are made with more care.
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#5
Quote by hell_monkey
So the only difference between the two guitars would be the extra couple hundred dollars that you spent improving the bad one, correct?

But then what the hell was the point in buying the bad studio?
#6
every guitar plays differently. they have this thing i like to call "suspension". it makes the guitar's tension harder or looser. it doesn't matter what kind of strings/setup you use, but that guitar will always feel stiff. i refer to this as "High Tension". now some guitars juts have an unbeleiveable playability and just feel pleasent to pick up and jam. those have "Low Tension". i have no clue what causes it. it ha nothing to do with hardware, strings, factory, wood, etc. i have played guitars with close serial numbers that had different "suspension". just keep searching until you find your "Grail" or "Pearly Gates".
#7
Quote by Jhachey22
every guitar plays differently. they have this thing i like to call "suspension". it makes the guitar's tension harder or looser. it doesn't matter what kind of strings/setup you use, but that guitar will always feel stiff. i refer to this as "High Tension". now some guitars juts have an unbeleiveable playability and just feel pleasent to pick up and jam. those have "Low Tension". i have no clue what causes it. it ha nothing to do with hardware, strings, factory, wood, etc. i have played guitars with close serial numbers that had different "suspension". just keep searching until you find your "Grail" or "Pearly Gates".


I know exactly what you mean there and it was something I felt from guitars. Suspension is a good word for it. Couldn't explain it but surprising thing is some cheap guitars got the "mojo" like the better made guitars. That doesn't mean that it is as good because they're made with cheaper wood and hardware.

So it has to be from cuts of wood that was the right combinations for a toneful construction.
#8
there are no "bad" guitars, just bad players.
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