#1
I am making a little tune in blues in the key of e( E G A Bb B D E).

Im doin the g seventh chord now(G Major=G A B C D E F# G) and i get G -B -D-F#

Can i do a seventh chord that just has a "double flattened" 7th?

Or could i augment it to go up one step to a G?

Do i even make any sense?(go light on me im new to this)
#2
^ well yes technically you can do anything, theory is a tool used for describing how and why things sound good. in the end if it sounds good then use it.

now more specifically depending on where you're going to, from this G chord might be able to help determine what kind of 7 you want to use.
#3
Quote by z4twenny
^ well yes technically you can do anything, theory is a tool used for describing how and why things sound good. in the end if it sounds good then use it.

now more specifically depending on where you're going to, from this G chord might be able to help determine what kind of 7 you want to use.


ya i am really trying to get what you say but its not clear...

i am asking what kind of seventh chord has only a bb7 and nothing else changed.

it not a diminished because ithas a b3 and a b5.
#4
Quote by z4twenny
^ well yes technically you can do anything, theory is a tool used for describing how and why things sound good. in the end if it sounds good then use it.

now more specifically depending on where you're going to, from this G chord might be able to help determine what kind of 7 you want to use.



alright now imgetting what you are saying, it doesnt have to be an exact chord as long as the notes in the chord are in the origignal key.
#5
bb7 is enharmonic to 6, so you would have 1 3 5 6 which is a 6 chord (eg G6 would be G B D E). Notice that this is also an inversion of Em7 (E G B D)
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#6
Quote by Ænimus Prime
bb7 is enharmonic to 6, so you would have 1 3 5 6 which is a 6 chord (eg G6 would be G B D E). Notice that this is also an inversion of Em7 (E G B D)



ok ill try and get that. i dont understand how flattening a 7th would be an enharmonic though since an enhamronic is the same note but a different name like a C# is a Db. im basically just chiseling it down to a em7 then( which is the the first chord in the sequence also).
#7
Quote by Ænimus Prime
bb7 is enharmonic to 6, so you would have 1 3 5 6 which is a 6 chord (eg G6 would be G B D E). Notice that this is also an inversion of Em7 (E G B D)



alright i just checked out my chord book and those notes are both an em7 and a g6, just like you said, thanks.
#8
The above posts are correct, but you should know for future reference that, while a bb7 is enharmonic to a sixth, it is not a sixth. In most cases, calling a chord with a bb7 a sixth chord would be incorrect. A fully diminished chord, for example, consists of a root, a minor third, a diminished fifth, and a diminished seventh (1-b3-b5-bb7). Despite being enharmonic to a major sixth, the bb7 in this case is just that (a diminished seventh), and calling it something else would be incorrect and misleading.
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#9
Quote by All_Bodies
I am making a little tune in blues in the key of e( E G A Bb B D E).

Im doin the g seventh chord now(G Major=G A B C D E F# G) and i get G -B -D-F#

Can i do a seventh chord that just has a "double flattened" 7th?

Or could i augment it to go up one step to a G?

Do i even make any sense?(go light on me im new to this)


You CAN have a double-flattened 7th, but as Archeo said, that would just be a 6th. But the 7th chord you showed doesn't have a flattened seventh at all...you showed a major 7th chord. You could change the notes to G B D F and that would be a G7. I think that's what you're looking for.
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#10
you dont use g major in a blues you use g mixolydian, traditionally all chords in a blues are dominant 7ths, hence a typical I,IV,V in c being C7, F7,G7 rather than the diatonic Cmaj7,Fmaj7,G7 if you want to be really analytical each chord is in a different key...but noone applys theory to the blues....its about feel

so to answer your question, can you have a double flattened 7th

of course....

1,3,5,bb7 ..... = 1,3,5,6 its a maj 6th chord...

other combinations using 7ths
1,3,5,b7 = dom7
1,3,5,7 = maj 7
1,b3,5,b7 = min 5 (double flattening 7th gives a min6th)
1,b3,,b5,b7 = min7b5 (double flattening the 7th gives.....
.....1,b3,b5,bb7 = dim7
#11
you dont use g major in a blues you use g mixolydian


Modal music of any kind would be rare. G major is perfectly fine to use in blues.

1,b3,5,b7 = min 5 (double flattening 7th gives a min6th)


That is a minor seventh chord. Double flatting the seventh does not give you a m6 chord, which contains a sixth, not a diminished seventh.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.