#1
hey guys, i just got the most amazing steal on a lefty 12 string so, i read that of corse, more strings means more tension which over a few years warps badly

so i was wondering if i down tune and capo will the intonation be the same?
ive never used a capo so im not sure

thanks guys, also recomend me some songs too

edit, can anyone also recomend me a good 6 and 12 string, be there such a beast im not sure how thick the neck is but ill stop at a music store on my way home and see what they have
Last edited by 12stringhelp at Aug 2, 2008,
#2
If it's a decently made 12 string, you have no worries with the neck warping over the years. The reason being is that they have a stiffer truss rod installed in them to counteract the added tension from those 6 extra strings. Remember too that the octave strings on a 12 string aren't the same gauge as the standard 6 are, but quite a bit smaller. It isn't as though the thing is strung up with mooring cables or anything. It'll be fine in other words. Downtuning and capo'ing to compensate for a myth is not advisable. No, the intonation won't change by using a capo. That is built into the guitar by the position and degree of compensation of the saddle, the placement of the nut, and the placement of the frets, and the scale length of course, but intonation is based on that anyhow.
I'm curious, what 12 string lefty model did you get? You failed to mention it.
#3
im not so sure on the model but its a norman
ive never heard of them, so im assuming its not the toughest beast made thats why i was wondering about the capo
#4
Norman guitars are a subdivision of Godin, which is a pretty large Canada based guitar company. Other notable guitar divisions of theirs are Seagull, Art & Lutherie, Simon & Patrick. Have a look at the site and see if you can find your model there. You might be surprised at what you find.

http://www.godinguitars.com/
#5
ya i have an art & lutherie 6 string acoustic
but im guessing its the b20 seeing as how its the only 12 string there
#6
Yep, that's what I thought also. So as for your original concern with neck warpage and whatnot, don't sweat it. Tune it up to concert pitch, use the capo if you like, or not, and have fun with it. I would pop for a new set of strings right away unless you know that the one's on it now are fairly new. Keep it at the right humidity and it ought to be a fine guitar. Congrats!
#7
haha thanks :P

but ya thats also another problem for me, im in canada one day its 90% humidity the next day its bone dry the next day its raining and im in a basment but anyway, ya thanks
#8
Quote by 12stringhelp
haha thanks :P

but ya thats also another problem for me, im in canada one day its 90% humidity the next day its bone dry the next day its raining and im in a basment but anyway, ya thanks


Well what the heck are you doing down there? Get out of the basement man! hahaha, just kidding.

I assume it's a finished basement, and not just bare concrete walls and floor. Basements by the way are the absolute worst places in a house to keep guitars. Far far too damp usually. If there's any way for you to store the guitar up on a different floor safely, please do so. Apart from that, you need to be able to condition the air somehow so that you keep the area that the guitar is in at approx. 45-50% rH(relative humidity) and at about 70 degrees F(21 degrees C). If you can manage it, your guitar and you will feel comfortable in this range. Summertime means you need to remove excess moisture from the air, and winter means you need to add it back because it's normally too dry then. As the ambient temperature rises, the ability for air to hold more moisture rises also, relative to the temp. Thus the term "relative" humidity. Vice versa as the temp drops, it can't keep hold of as much moisture so it dry's out. Just some more food for thought for you to chew on. lol
#9
When you say 'warped' neck, do you mean too much neck relief [the slight bow in the neck that should be there when you look down the edge of the neck] ?

If the problem is too much neck relief [too much bow], you should be able to reduce it by countering string tension with a bit more truss-rod tension. With the strings on and at concert pitch, tighten the truss-rod nut a little [clockwise] to reduce the bow. Don't tighten it so the neck is straight as there should be a very slight bow or your strings will buzz.

If your using a capo, don't leave it on the guitar when not playing. It's a fret killer.
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 3, 2008,
#10
Quote by LeftyDave
Well what the heck are you doing down there? Get out of the basement man! hahaha, just kidding.

I assume it's a finished basement, and not just bare concrete walls and floor. Basements by the way are the absolute worst places in a house to keep guitars. Far far too damp usually. If there's any way for you to store the guitar up on a different floor safely, please do so. Apart from that, you need to be able to condition the air somehow so that you keep the area that the guitar is in at approx. 45-50% rH(relative humidity) and at about 70 degrees F(21 degrees C). If you can manage it, your guitar and you will feel comfortable in this range. Summertime means you need to remove excess moisture from the air, and winter means you need to add it back because it's normally too dry then. As the ambient temperature rises, the ability for air to hold more moisture rises also, relative to the temp. Thus the term "relative" humidity. Vice versa as the temp drops, it can't keep hold of as much moisture so it dry's out. Just some more food for thought for you to chew on. lol



actually.. no its not a finished basment, i have carpet in my room and rock board for my room walls but thats it

and thanks
#11
and bte, the necks as straight as an arrow
its practically a brand new guitar, the guy just never played it because he couldnt get his picking percise enough?
anyway, ya brand new pretty much
#12
Quote by 12stringhelp
and bte, the necks as straight as an arrow


How can your 'straight as an arrow' neck be [also] warped?

The neck should not be as straight as an arrow. You need to loosen off your Truss-rod [counter-clockwise] so there is a little bow if it really is 'straight as an arrow'. Without that bow, when your strings vibrate they hit the frets [if they aren't giving you fret buzz, your neck is not as straight as an arrow as you think].

The harder you play the more neck relief there should be, but even a soft finger-picker needs some slight bow in the neck. Punters often think necks should be dead straight. Dead wrong. Check out some new guitars in a shop and sight down the edge of the finger- board, they won't be dead straight!

A 'straight neck' means a neck with the normal amount of slight bow. Not arrow straight.

Go here to learn a bit about basic guitar set-up, especially about neck 'relief':

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 4, 2008,