#2
There would be no sound.
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#3
No. There's no air for the sound waves to travel through.
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#5
no, the guitar would implode, then explode, then implode again.
you would have aids, and the sun would fall out of the sky.


there's no sound in space, so I'm assuming there're also no vibrations? corrections?
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#8
The vacuum would cancel out sound.
Have you never heard the phrase "nobody can hear you scream in space"?
Or better: "Nobody can hear you say no in space"
#9
I would worry more about your blood boiling than playing I Cum Blood in space.
time machine. Inadvertently, I had created a
#10
In space, no one can hear you shred.
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#11
I think you mean, "Would a guitar work in a zero-G environment?"

In which case, of course. Why wouldn't it? Guitars do not depend on gravity.
#13
but what about in a shuttle, that was his original question, as i predicted

<_<

>_>

^ I don't even know what those things mean, they just make me look cool

#14
Quote by Flying Couch
I think you mean, "Would a guitar work in a zero-G environment?"

In which case, of course. Why wouldn't it? Guitars do not depend on gravity.
Are you sure?
#15
Quote by Just Andrew
In space, no one can hear you shred.

I think I love you.
#16
electric guitar with headphones should work. no need for air, its all electronic
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#17
One can not simply play guitar in space.
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#18
Surely an electric guitar would continue to function, but the amplifier would have to be in an air filled environment?
#20
Quote by man_po_po
Are you sure?

Yes.
Quote by Just Andrew
In space, no one can hear you shred.

Thank God.
#21
the guitar strings need tension on them, and must be compelled to vibrate. if the gravity didn't put pressure on the strings, then i don't think it would vibrate, dear sir.

i think im hot stuff now.

#22
Quote by SaintsofNowhere
the guitar strings need tension on them, and must be compelled to vibrate. if the gravity didn't put pressure on the strings, then i don't think it would vibrate, dear sir.

i think im hot stuff now.

Are you being serious, or just spouting random bullshit?
#23
a guitar word work just fine in space in the sense that the strings would still vibrate as they are intended to

however, if you try and play it in a vacuum there would be no air, therefore the vibrations would not reach your ears. if you have a space shuttle/space suit with the guitar plugged into the suit then you would be able to hear it just fine
#25
Easy answer - no.

For one you wouldnt be able to hear it, since there arent any sound waves for it to travel through.

Secondly, part of the reason why the guitar works is because gravity works with the string tensions to bring it a frequency. Places such as the moon - Mars etc. with different gravities would not "allow" it to work without being adjusted.
#26
The tension doesn't come from gravity, its from pulling the string amazingly tightly. I honestly don't think 0 gravity would have any affect of the physical aspect of the guitar itself.
#28
Quote by man_po_po
Are you sure?

Guitars have no part that needs to be triggered by gravity... and theoretically, you could play an electric in space outside the shuttle if the amp was inside your shuttle.

Edit: and before anyone says, no you couldn't remember an electric relies on electromagnetic vibrations, which do not require a medium.
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Last edited by 67SG at Aug 2, 2008,
#29
Simple fact of sound physics.

If there is a medium for the sound to travel through, then there is sound.
If there is a vaccuuuuuuum, then there is no sound.
Because sound is vibrations that our ear detects, turns into electronic signals, and our brains translates into sound.
Without something to vibrate, like air, or water, then you can't detect any vibrations.

In space, you couldn't hear yourself. UNless you had a space helmet filled with air and headphones.

on a space shuttle, if there was air, then you could hear yourself. As long as you could find a 120V outlet for the amp .

amirite, or amirite?
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#30
^exactly what i was saying

Quote by SaintsofNowhere
the guitar strings need tension on them, and must be compelled to vibrate. if the gravity didn't put pressure on the strings, then i don't think it would vibrate, dear sir.

i think im hot stuff now.


the tension has nothing to do with gravity. the tension on your guitar strings comes the string being stretched between the bridge and the headstock.

if gravity affected the tension on a guitar you wouldnt be able to play it upside down now would you
#31
Quote by SaintsofNowhere
the guitar strings need tension on them, and must be compelled to vibrate. if the gravity didn't put pressure on the strings, then i don't think it would vibrate, dear sir.

i think im hot stuff now.


No, they would vibrate. At different frequencies though. You could adjust the guitar, and get it to work how a guitar would on Earth, but that would be extremely difficult. It wouldn't work straight out. However with the work it could possibly with a lot of work - but straight out it wouldnt.
#32
Quote by SuperKoolKid
Simple fact of sound physics.

If there is a medium for the sound to travel through, then there is sound.
If there is a vaccuuuuuuum, then there is no sound.
Because sound is vibrations that our ear detects, turns into electronic signals, and our brains translates into sound.
Without something to vibrate, like air, or water, then you can't detect any vibrations.

In space, you couldn't hear yourself. UNless you had a space helmet filled with air and headphones.

on a space shuttle, if there was air, then you could hear yourself. As long as you could find a 120V outlet for the amp .

amirite, or amirite?

amen
#33
if your wondering why not form a group of mildly retarted terrorists and overtake NASA?
#34
as long as there's no speaker(like D.I. Box to recorder)

or

helmet filled with air & headphones


but i think...

1. with a space suit you wouldn't be able to play the damn guitar

2. radiations(a fluorescent light bulb can make a amp(or any electrical circuit) hum like hell, in space, there's the direct radiation from our old friend the sun, those can cause cancer & radiation burns, so i don't think you'd be able to hear yourself over the hum.

So: No Guitar In Space Because Of Radiations(HUM!)


/thread