#1
Hello, i have 2 of questions regarding open chords.


First is switching between them. I have been trying to switch for about 2 days, i see imporvement, but still is very slow. Any tips on how to make it faster?

Second, when trying to play the A chord or similar where you have to squeeze a bunch of fingers toghether, it gets crammed, and it gets a buzzing sound. The only time i can do it is with luck and i push down like i was choking my ex's boyfriend.


That is all, thanks guys..

By the way, i try to practice as much as i can, more then 15 minutes a day.
So if anyone says practice is key, then perhaps im already on the right track.


Thanks guys (and girls)
#3
well you can practice with a metronome. Start it with a tempo you can switch at, then move it slightly faster and try keeping up with that, once you achive that repeat

Sorry I cant help with the A, I never had that problem

and when you say you practice more than 15 minutes a day, is that just chord changes or everything you do?
#4
For A, (I'm assuming that's where you play c#, a, e - I forgotten most of my chords), you could bar your finger across them all, but I just use my fingers, not my pinky, and start on e with my 3rd, a with my middle, c# with my index, I get no buzzes or anything.

And yes, you should practice a HELL of alot more then 15 minutes a day.. I know it seems like a long ass time when your new, but wait until you get a bit better, time just flies by, I practice and mess around with like 1 song for about an hour, and it goes like nothing.
#5
Switching between chords take time, but to practice just sit there and switch between two with out strumming to work on muscle memory.

And if you talking about a plain open A chord, just try barring the 3 string with 1 finger instead of 3.

and try to bump your practice time up to 30 min if not more.
#6
im sorry if somebody had a few misconception, when i say 15 minutes, i mean that at a time. I usually practice for 15, then go do something to reset my mind, then do it again, I usually do that for about 4-6 times a day.
#7
I do A differently, put your index finger on the 2nd fret of the G string, your middle finger on the same fret on the D string, and your ring finger on the B string (same fret as well) that should make it easier to switch to D chord too because you'd only have to move your 2nd and 3rd fingers.

Rave
#8
There's a lesson on this site somewhere that covers a thing called "pivot finger" where you can leave one finger where it is when you change chords or just slide it up/down a fret or two, the idea being that you stay in contact with the strings when chord changing.
Obviously this only works for certain chord changes, but it got me into very good habits.
Every time you change a chord, go over it slowly and see if there is anything you can do to minimise finger movement, for example, when changing from the E chord to the D chord, your index finger stays on the string but slides up one fret as you put your other fingers down, this eliminates having to take all your fingers off.
Good luck.
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#9
Quote by simplekin88
Hello, i have 2 of questions regarding open chords.


First is switching between them. I have been trying to switch for about 2 days, i see imporvement, but still is very slow. Any tips on how to make it faster?

Second, when trying to play the A chord or similar where you have to squeeze a bunch of fingers toghether, it gets crammed, and it gets a buzzing sound. The only time i can do it is with luck and i push down like i was choking my ex's boyfriend.


That is all, thanks guys..

By the way, i try to practice as much as i can, more then 15 minutes a day.
So if anyone says practice is key, then perhaps im already on the right track.


Thanks guys (and girls)


One tip I can suggest is start playing really slow. You will eventually get faster. And dont push it too hard.
#10
The advice about pivot fingers was right on the money. Guitarists are lazy, we look for any way to keep from moving any more than we absolutely have to. Take the transition between C and Am, for instance. The first and second fingers are on notes common to both chords, so why bother moving them when switching between these chords? DON'T!!

As for the A chord, there are a few different methods that I've had success with in teaching. According to my 35 students, the easiest way to play it is with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th fingers crammed onto the second fret. That group of three fingers takes up less room than the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, so it's easier to get them parallel to the fret.

Also, make sure you're squeezing up against the second fret. You have to press a LOT harder the farther you get from the desired fret in order to get your notes to sound.

YMMV.

Brettski