#1
hey Hey Hey. Just a quick question.

If someone says to solo over something, this is basically y plan of action at the moment...work out the realtive minor and us that pentatonic.

But, I understand there is a major pentatonic too? Whats the difference, and also could you direct me to or put up a box shape of it?

OR

I just use that keys scale.

I know the box shap and climbing neck things for major,
but whats the box shape for a minor scale please?

Also, whats with normal and melodic minors?
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#2
Well a minor pentatonic can fit over the Aeolian, Phrygian, and Dorian. Honestly I would just usie the minor pentatonic shape, and if you want to get more specific than that, skip the major pentatonics, and go straight to modes.
#3
yeah, tried modes with my teacher and there pretty mind boggling. I thought maybe major box shape would be a good "in the mean time" at least.
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#4
Yeah better yet just learn Maj, Maj7, Min, Min7, 7, and -m7b5 arrpeggios. That way you can isolate those important chord tones when soloing. Then if it feels really good and you want more! Learn to do extenision in the arpeggios.
#5
as long as you have your basic chords down, i would just focus on modes. They are a pain in the ass at first, but if you really want to understand how to fluidly move up, down, left, and right during a solo (both vertical and horizontal) then i would learn modes. While you may not use every mode, they will be useful and allow you to play freely, rather then bound to the pentatonic shapes or a scale. its basically taking the major, minor, or pent. scales and finding out where you can play them on the neck.


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#6
Yeah chip munk is right and he reminded me of something I should tell you. When you learn this stuff, its going to be like learning the major scale all the way up the neck, but in sections. So get each section or mode down well. Then be able to seamlessly move between them and play between two patterns, and learn Modes with the root on the 6 5 4 string that way you can play atleast 3 modes in the same position.
#7
Firstly, do you know the intervals of the major scale? Can you form a four note chord built on thirds? Do you have a basic understanding of diatonic harmony? If you don't know these things, then you should not be diving into the modes.

And to both of you guys above, knowing the box shapes are not the same thing as playing different modes. If you are playing a G major scale starting on the third note, you are NOT playing B Phrygian. You are only playing the third posistion of said scale. Modes and posistions are waaaaaaaaaaaaaay too often confused on the this forum...
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#8
But, I understand there is a major pentatonic too? Whats the difference, and also could you direct me to or put up a box shape of it?
The major pentatonic will have the same notes as it's relative minor pentatonic, so they have the same shape but the root note is different.

For example go to www.all-guitar-chords.com, use the scale section and compare E minor pentatonic to G major pentatonic.

but whats the box shape for a minor scale please?
Again, the minor scale has the same notes and the same shape as it's relative major but the roots are different.

Here is the first box of the A natural minor scale
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=5&scch=A&scchnam=Natural%20(Pure)%20Minor&get2=Get&choice=1

Also, whats with normal and melodic minors?

Compared to natural minor, melodic minor has a raised sixth and seventh degree.
Comparing the intervals of the two:
Natural Minor:
A B C D E F G
1 M2 m3 P4 P5 m6 m7
Melodic Minor:
A B C D E F# G#
1 M2 m3 P4 P5 M6 M7

There is also Harmonic minor, which only has a raised seventh
A B C D E F G#
1 M2 m3 P4 P5 m6 M7
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#9
When someone tells you to solo over a piece, you don't have to stick to the pentatonics. You can solo over the chord prgoression using a multitude of scales. One common mistake beginner solo-players make is, that, if a piece is in the key of A minor, they'll grab the Am scale, and play it to death.

If the progression is, say, F C Am D, the Am scale is the easiest soloing solution, BUT, if solo over each chord, e.g, play F major over the F, and D Maj over the D, that will sound a lot better, and less generic.
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#10
Quote by Iron_Dude
Firstly, do you know the intervals of the major scale? Can you form a four note chord built on thirds? Do you have a basic understanding of diatonic harmony? If you don't know these things, then you should not be diving into the modes.

And to both of you guys above, knowing the box shapes are not the same thing as playing different modes. If you are playing a G major scale starting on the third note, you are NOT playing B Phrygian. You are only playing the third posistion of said scale. Modes and posistions are waaaaaaaaaaaaaay too often confused on the this forum...


Rather than tell people they're simply wrong, would it be that hard to explain or point people in the direction (link) for correction?


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#11
Quote by chipmunksurfer
as long as you have your basic chords down, i would just focus on modes. They are a pain in the ass at first, but if you really want to understand how to fluidly move up, down, left, and right during a solo (both vertical and horizontal) then i would learn modes. While you may not use every mode, they will be useful and allow you to play freely, rather then bound to the pentatonic shapes or a scale. its basically taking the major, minor, or pent. scales and finding out where you can play them on the neck.

I would stay as far away from modes as possible - they're not all that useful in the greater scheme of things and there's no point trying to learn them until you've got a good grasp of more fundamental concepts like the major scale. Modes have nothing to do with teaching you to move around the neck.

For a quick fix yes, you can find the minor pentatonic box-shape for the key you're in but that's flailing around in the dark and extrememely limiting. Patterns are next to worthless without the underlying knowledge of the scale which allows you to know how and when to use the pattern. Best advice I can give is that you get yourself started learning theory - learn the notes on the fretboard and start reading Josh Urban's crusade articles in the Columns section.
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#12
Quote by chipmunksurfer
Rather than tell people they're simply wrong, would it be that hard to explain or point people in the direction (link) for correction?

I'd be happy to.

http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

The Crusades by Josh Urban is another good series of articles on theory.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
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#13
Amin Pentatonic shape 1

------5-8
-----5-8
----5-7
---5-7
--5-7
-5-8

Amin Pentatonic shape 2 (aka C major Pentatonic shape 1)

-------8-10
------8-10
----7--9
---7-10
--7-10
-8-10