#1
I just ordered myself a brand new Blackheart 5watt tube amp, which should be loads better than my old amp. I think my next investment for guitar should be some new electronics for my MIM HSS Strat. I atleast want to change the pickups. Do they make HSS pickup sets? Or do I have to buy them separately? What other electronics should I change? I'm not sure what else is in the wiring of a guitar, besides the pots. I also heard about shielding the inside of your guitar so that it cuts out a ton of feedback and hum and I'm thinking about doing that, if it really does make a difference.

Would it be better to pay someone qualified to change everything? I'm rather good at learning new things, especially anything involving tools, fixing things, ect. I don't know how to, nor have I ever tried to solder, but I've seen it done a million times. I could definitly learn with a little practice. Should I try it myself, or leave it to the pros?

I also hate the tremelo bridge that's on my fender. I don't like how hard it is to tune. Even bending one string makes the others go out of tune. Right now I have it set up so that the springs pull it all the way down. I can still bend the strings down in pitch, just not up at all. I'm thinking of maybe replacing this with something like the tune-o-matic bridges i see on epiphones and gibsons. The other thing I am considering is getting a new tremelo bridge, but only if it will stay in tune better and it's not such a bitch to tune. But I don't even know if a more expensive tremelo would solve my problem.

Finally, I want to change the tuning keys on my guitar. What kind of tuners should I get, and how hard is it to change them yourself?

Thanks
#2
Pickup wise, I would buy individual p'ups. You can pick each one that suits your needs then. You could change the jack to a switchcraft if you like. For my MIM strat, I'm getting a aluminium pickguard shield that just fit's under your pickguard. They're supposed to really make a difference.

Personally, I would do it myself. I had never soldered before I changed my pickups and with a little practice, they turned out fine. It's not worth the cost of taking it to a pro, do it yourself

When you bend a string and the others go out of tune, do you mena temporarily (sp?) or when you release the bend they stay out? If it's the first then I'm affraid most trems with springs do this. If it's the latter, the a new bridge would help. But some locking tuners would also help greatly. You could block off your trem, to make it stay in tune, and if you never use it then do it. It doesn't cost anyhting (except the price of a small bit of wood). Alternatively, you can buy hardtail strat bridges.

On my MIM strat, I'm putting some locking tuners on. If you don't mind a bit of manual work then sperze;s are good (you'd have to ream the holes and drill a little hole). If you want a straight swap, then maybe look at the the fender/schaller locking tuners. These are a direct fit I think.

And lastly, perhaps you would benefit from a new nut. Graphtech nuts will reduce friction and help your guitar stay in tune better. A cheaper option is to put some pencil lead in to the nut slots (it works well)

Hope that helped
#3
^ what he said
Gear:
Fender Mexican Standard Strat(Sunburst, Rosewood, Custom Shop '69 pickups)
Fender Super Champ XD
EHX Big Muff Pi
Yamaha Acoustic
Alvarez Silver Anniversary Acoustic
#5
You should get sprezels (like he said) and this bridge:

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Bridges,_tailpieces/Electric_guitar_tremolos/Wilkinson_Gotoh_VSVG_Vintage_Tremolo.html

The nut thats in there is fine.

I did this to my MIM strat and its awesome. I had the same problem with the bridge tuning thing. Its the tuners too.

All this stuff costs but in the end you'll have a sweet gweet.

Also copper is best for shielding
#6
^But then you still have to live with the zinc block. Although callaham bridges may be expensive, I think they are the best hands down... (not that I've tried every bridge, just based upon the quality of theirs compared to stock)
#8
I believe you get less sustain out of a zinc block. Fender originally used steel but changed to cheaper materials as time went on. I think they might use steel blocks on the AVRIs but even then, they use hot rolled steel (not cold rolled as per originals and callaham)
#9
If you don't like the trem, you should be able to replace it with a hardtail.
#10
The thing i dont like about the vintage trem is when you palm mute it's a little sharp because of the saddle adjuster thingy's, know what i mean?
#11
Quote by supergerbil
I believe you get less sustain out of a zinc block. Fender originally used steel but changed to cheaper materials as time went on. I think they might use steel blocks on the AVRIs but even then, they use hot rolled steel (not cold rolled as per originals and callaham)



the new american standards (2008 models) have cold rolled steel again...yay....but u cant buy that bridge seperate from the guitar. callaham ftw...
Gibson SG Faded
Epi VJ Stack


Quote by Øttər
Whenever I clean my guitars, my family wonders why it smells so good; I say that I exude a fresh citrus scent from hidden orifices.
They stopped asking
#12
Get individual pickups. Personally I would recommend leosounds singlee coils and get a seymour duncan humbucker that cater to your style and tonal needs. Next after you purchase all the pickups get a strat wiring kit from stewmac because relacing the wiring with the pickups will make it sound way better.
#13
A good bridge would be an OFR or a Kahler, but they both require routing. A different solution which isn't used much, is called the Super Vee tremolo, specially designed for Strats. It comes with the Super Vee nut and tremolo.
http://www.super-vee.com/
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#15
Quote by asfastasdark
A good bridge would be an OFR or a Kahler, but they both require routing. A different solution which isn't used much, is called the Super Vee tremolo, specially designed for Strats. It comes with the Super Vee nut and tremolo.
http://www.super-vee.com/


Yeah, but what about if only wants a vintage type trem. I had a guitar with a double locking trem and I cound't get the really small bends down I wanted on chords. A small touch and it was down maybe a semi-tone or so...