#1
ok, so i have a song that has this progression:
Gmaj7, Bm7, Em7, C7.

So, I play each chord for one bar each, except for the Gmaj7. For the first half of that bar, I play a standard Gmaj7. But for the second half, i play this chord:


|-------------------------|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|-------------------------|
|---4---------------------|-------------------------|
|---5---------------------|-------------------------|
|---6---------------------|-------------------------|


Which includes a minor third!! It still sounds like I'm playing a Gmaj7, but this chord kind of "leads" to the next chord, a Bm7. So what would I call this chord? And what would the theory be behind it?
#3
It still sounds like a Gmaj7 because you're just changing the root note. It doesn't contain a minor third though, don't know how you saw that (although I'm definitely not sure about this)...

This would be called an inbetween chord. Basically, the Bb you're playing isn't in the key the chord progression is in, however, you can sometimes use notes outside of the scale or key, usually chromatic notes such as here, to do just what you said, to lead to the next chord. It usually just creates a more interesting and dynamic feel to the song.

*As always, if there is anything wrong in my post please someone point it out, and TS, I'd wait to see if I'm right before you go ahead and take what I said word for word
Alta Vera - My real life alternative rock band.
Ashen Spire - My personal metal band.

Super Mario, F-Zero & Dragonball Z covers!

PSN: whatev27

Let me ask you, does a machine like yourself ever experience fear?

Last edited by NovemberRain273 at Aug 3, 2008,
#4
Quote by NovemberRain273
It still sounds like a Gmaj7 because you're just changing the root note. It doesn't contain a minor third though, don't know how you saw that...This would be called an inbetween chord. Basically, the Bb you're playing isn't in the key the chord progression is in, however, you can sometimes use notes outside of the scale or key, usually chromatic notes such as here, to do just what you said, to lead to the next chord. It usually just creates a more interesting and dynamic feel to the song.

*As always, if there is anything wrong in my post please someone point it out, and TS, I'd wait to see if I'm right before you go ahead and take what I said word for word



I like your Conan off to the side there
#5
Quote by Guitarfreak777
I like your Conan off to the side there


Haha thanks
Alta Vera - My real life alternative rock band.
Ashen Spire - My personal metal band.

Super Mario, F-Zero & Dragonball Z covers!

PSN: whatev27

Let me ask you, does a machine like yourself ever experience fear?

#6
Quote by NovemberRain273
It still sounds like a Gmaj7 because you're just changing the root note. It doesn't contain a minor third though, don't know how you saw that...This would be called an inbetween chord. Basically, the Bb you're playing isn't in the key the chord progression is in, however, you can sometimes use notes outside of the scale or key, usually chromatic notes such as here, to do just what you said, to lead to the next chord. It usually just creates a more interesting and dynamic feel to the song.

*As always, if there is anything wrong in my post please someone point it out, and TS, I'd wait to see if I'm right before you go ahead and take what I said word for word


I figured someone would just say that it was some sort of chromatisism (that a word?). But i'm still confused, because Bb would be the minor third of G... and I'm in the key of Gmajor and the chord has a major 7 in it. What do I call this chord? I can't name it Gmaj7/Bb because there isn't a major 3rd... And I can't name it Gm7/Bb because there isn't a minor 7 (but there IS a major 7)... There has to be something that I'm not thinking of.

Btw, Conan = awesome.
#7
Quote by tbob
I figured someone would just say that it was some sort of chromatisism (that a word?). But i'm still confused, because Bb would be the minor third of G... and I'm in the key of Gmajor and the chord has a major 7 in it. What do I call this chord? I can't name it Gmaj7/Bb because there isn't a major 3rd... And I can't name it Gm7/Bb because there isn't a minor 7 (but there IS a major 7)... There has to be something that I'm not thinking of.

Btw, Conan = awesome.



You check the link I provided? You don't think its an aug chord?


You guys excited that Conan is getting the tonight show next year?
#8
Quote by Guitarfreak777
You check the link I provided? You don't think its an aug chord?


You guys excited that Conan is getting the tonight show next year?


you know what... Hmmm maybe I've been making this harder than it should be. It actually might be that A#aug (Bbaug)... I've just been under the impression that it should be named like... G something... But i guess a Bbaug could just act as some sort of "transition chord." I still think it's weird though.
Last edited by tbob at Aug 3, 2008,
#9
It's an augmented chord. Usually diminished chords or augmented chords are used as inbetween chords for this kind of transition, although diminished is probably more common.

And yes, conan does rock.
Alta Vera - My real life alternative rock band.
Ashen Spire - My personal metal band.

Super Mario, F-Zero & Dragonball Z covers!

PSN: whatev27

Let me ask you, does a machine like yourself ever experience fear?

#10
What I'm seeing is this

Gmaj7 = G B D F# Then A# D F# Moving to Bm7 = B D F# A

The A# works well in the bass smoothing the G to B bass line step. While the D and F# provide the consistency and familiarity throughout the changes to help make the out of key A#more acceptable. The A# then provides a strong resolve up a semitone to the new bass and root B note of the Bm7 chord.
Not sure what to call the chord though. A number of labels could be used.
Si
#11
Quote by tbob
you know what... Hmmm maybe I've been making this harder than it should be. It actually might be that A#aug (Bbaug)... I've just been under the impression that it should be named like... G something... But i guess a Bbaug could just act as some sort of "transition chord." I still think it's weird though.



It can't be a 7th those, only 1 3 5
#12
Quote by tbob
No, cause it still "sounds" like a Gmaj7. Not a D, F#, A#. None of those really seem to make sense in this situation.


Like I said, it still sounds like a Gmaj7 because you're only changing the root note. While Gmaj7 contains G D F# B, that chord you play, contains A# D F#.

The D and the F# (and the B) are the notes that give the Gmaj7 the "maj7" part of it, not the G. However, when you couple the D and F# with the A#, you get an augmented chord, which is somewhat similar to the maj7.

And the reason it doesn't make sense is because it isn't really part of the scale, it's just a chord used for transitional purposes.
Alta Vera - My real life alternative rock band.
Ashen Spire - My personal metal band.

Super Mario, F-Zero & Dragonball Z covers!

PSN: whatev27

Let me ask you, does a machine like yourself ever experience fear?

#13
Alright, awesome, thanks everyone! I just kept thinking that it had to be named G something. It makes a lot more sense now.

Thanks again!
#14
Ok, I know I'm probably taking this too far, but what if THIS was the chord:


|---3---------------------|-------------------------|
|---3---------------------|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|-------------------------|
|---4---------------------|-------------------------|
|---5---------------------|-------------------------|
|---6---------------------|-------------------------|


What the hell would I name that? Bb, D, F#, and G...
#16
^ To be more exact, Gm(maj7)/Bb.

The formula for a minor major seventh chord is 1 b3 5 7. I rarely ever see (or hear) them used, but the word well in some places (Michelle by The Beatles).


The first chord you inquired about contains A# D and F# or Bb D and Gb. Therefore I would call it Gb+/Bb. 1 3 #5. If Gb is the root, Bb is the major third and D is the sharp fifth.

Arguably one could call it F#+ - but I don't feel like that works because an F#+ chord needs F# A# C## (C doublesharp). C## is enharmonic to D, but as far as I know the note is D and not C## in the context that you are playing.


In conclusion, the first chord was Gb+ and the second is Gm(maj7).