#1
I have an electric guitar with distortion and an acoustic guitar. I have been laying for 3 months and have learnt some slightly advanced songs such as Stairway to Heaven I can play barre chords and all the major and minor chords.
I play about 2-3 hours a day and seemed to have just stop learning over the past couple of weeks.
I would just like somebody to kindly suggest a practice schedule.
thanks
#2
Its not all about learning Tab's from other people's songs. Its about Exercises, that develope Finger Strength, Speed, Accuracy, so on so forth. A small part of a Scale can be used for beginner practices on this such thing. I personally make my own Practice Routines. I'd be happy to help or give you some of them. If interested private message me on here, figure out a way to do it.
"Speed is nothing without control" - Bart Frydrychowitcz

Mark Morton is a God

Gear
Schecter Gryphon Diamond Series Limited Edition
Carvin SX-300 Half Stack
Podxt Live
V-amp 2
Peavey Transtube 110efx
#5
- First, find a nice warm up technique. Michael Angelo Baito has an awesome one, try and find it. If you cannot, I may be bothered to type it up. Practise that for about 15 minutes, until your fingers are nubile and comfortable.

- Then practise a bunch of important scales - I can't tell you which ones because it depends on the music you play and what you already are aware of - make sure that you practise them in different positions on the fret board. Do this for half an hour, if you can.

- Now reach into your chord catalogue and bash out a few chords in any order and with any rythym. Try jamming something to find a few patterns you like.

- Once you have done that - if you can record those chords, cool - break out your soloing skills and scales and try and jam a solo over the top of those chords. If you cannot do that, pretend you can. That may sound silly, but just try it.

- Now buy a few guitar magazines, look up some challenging songs of, non other than UG, and download Powertab. You could also look into the many excellent articles on this, and other web sites.
As for the practising, find some complicated techniques such as sweeping, bending, sliding, string skipping, down picking, sluring, tapping, etc and slow all of those down - these are techniques that you have taken from the tabs of songs, remember - and keep practising them over and over for the next hour or two.

- Then round it off by jamming for an hour with whatever you may of learned and whatever takes your fancy. Play along with your favourite songs on a CD.

All these techniques are best accompanied by a metronome, drum machine, or some form of constant rythym. Or even better, a band!

Its not a special routine or anything, but it helped me a lot.
Just don't forget your theory and jamming. Those are the most important things. Balance the two and your away with the fairies.

Digitally Clean
#6
do you have MSN or Yahoo Messenger?
"Speed is nothing without control" - Bart Frydrychowitcz

Mark Morton is a God

Gear
Schecter Gryphon Diamond Series Limited Edition
Carvin SX-300 Half Stack
Podxt Live
V-amp 2
Peavey Transtube 110efx
#9
I'll tell you what I've started doing this Summer to get me prepared for music college. My practice routine is as follows:
- For the first hour I play 10 minutes of angular, linear, legato and tapping exercises each followed by 20 minutes of sweeping exercises.
- In hour 2, I practice my scales, dedicating about half of that time to studying individual scales and incorporating them into my soloing.
- For the third hour I practice chords.
- The fourth hour I spend with my music notation book, studying and practicing.
- For hour 5 I practice ear training and music theory with various pieces of software, websites and books, as well as an exercise where I sing a note/phrase and then try and find it straight away on the guitar.
- Any other hours I spend playing guitar are jamming/composing/band practice/learning other songs.

A lot of that is taken from Steve Vai's 30 hour workout thing, which I find works well for me.

-EDIT- Also, I keep a diary of how long I've practiced for each day so I can keep tabs and set myself goals/targets and achievements.
#10
Send me your MSN Email in Private Message
"Speed is nothing without control" - Bart Frydrychowitcz

Mark Morton is a God

Gear
Schecter Gryphon Diamond Series Limited Edition
Carvin SX-300 Half Stack
Podxt Live
V-amp 2
Peavey Transtube 110efx
#13
Try keeping your practise station clean. It will help you concentrate on what you are playing. I found if everything was cluttered then my playing would suffer slightly.
Buy a nice size chair, a comfy one, and also purchase a foot stool for classical style practise that is the most appropriate size for your height and feet - experiment. Invest in a music stand to have all your sheet music placed on, and have a side table with all other equipment ready at your disposal, like a tuner, plectrums, string changing kit, pen and paper, tab books, capo, slide, and whatever else neccesary.
Keep all your pedals and cables neat and wind them up properly after each use, it will lengthen their life by about a double. There will also be no tripping over everything and will lend a more homely feel to your practise area when you return to it the next day.

Simple things make a difference. Thats about all I can think of right now, I'm off to bed.
Peace.
#15
Take every thing you know and play it with a metronome. Start early so its not a pain to do it later.

Also look up John Petruccis Rock Discipline. I got a couple of my exercises from him.
Sig What?
#18
Don't use a strict practice routine. Don't try to force it. It will come in time. Doing the same stuff over and over again will just disappoint you when you don't get the results you want in time. Eventually it will become more like a job or a chore than anything.

Now, I'm saying this specifically because you're a beginner, the guy above who does 5+ hours is probably good with his instrument and wouldn't see the frustration that a new player would. Same with Vai, Pretrucci, Gilbert, etc. Don't stop practicing, just don't force it. If you were going to play for five hours a day it should be a " how'd time pass me by " type thing, not a " times up on scales, now lets work on chord progressions!" thing.
#20
Quote by pkg2006
thanks for the advice
anyone give me some important scales to learn


Diatonic Modes. Harmonic Minor and its modes, Mostly phrygian dominant. Bebop Scale. Lydian Dominant. Whole Tone. Diminished. Octagonal.
Sig What?
#22
First and foremost, above all else, buy a chair that doesn't have arms. Chairs with arms are the natural enemies of guitarists.
Quote by stevenpollock
You can't be successful in Jazz music until you're at least 40. You don't have anything to say.
#25
Try the simple blues chord progressions to begin with, the rest will come in time. D7, G7, A, Jimi Hendrix chord (I don't know the correct name) that is a nice combo of chords, although they can moved around and altered in any way you want.
I never found learning cool chord progression recited from other people you don't know and can't here to be cubersome. The best thing to do is look up a few youtube videos of a Blue artists like Sonny Landreth, Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Nils Lofgren, John Lee Hooker, Robbie Krieger, and others to see what they play. In other words, find your favourite artists and learn their chord progressions, thats what I did.
Its not the official way to learn the Blues, but the whole aura attached to blues is that you are supposed to play from the soul, so there are not official ways to do it. Just play whats natural.