#1
i want to start writing my own music on guitar not lyrics
but idk where to start

i like to sit down and and jus mess around but i cant seem to get started on a song and finish it.

i dont know any music theory yet and i kno that would help a lot
but for now where do i start??
advice??
#2
I would say study your music theory. I use to not be able to make anything up on the guitar.

after I learned what chords and notes go with each other, then riffs and songs just started coming like crazy.

Look at some of the lessons on this site. there are great lessons on song structures and music theory.

I hope I helped.
#3
Maybe first decide what kind of song you want to write. Since its going to be an instrumental obviously(unless you plan on adding lyrics later or having someone else doing it) you've got to keep it interesting... but not cluttered.

Heavy? or clean for the most part?

Depressing or upbeat?

Just some things you might wanna think about
I'm Tyler
#4
Zepp: how much music theory is necesary (probably spelled that wrong) to right a good song?

Oct: i want to write both slow paced and then be able to write a badass in your face song
#5
Quote by Octtwe88
Maybe first decide what kind of song you want to write. Since its going to be an instrumental obviously(unless you plan on adding lyrics later or having someone else doing it) you've got to keep it interesting... but not cluttered.

Heavy? or clean for the most part?

Depressing or upbeat?

Just some things you might wanna think about

and on top of what he said, try and think, would I want to listen to this? Would the person listening enjoy this?

those are questions you MUST ask yourself. If your song is good, but doesn't go anywhere, or doesn't change its sound, then you might want to change the song or just scrap it altogether.
#6
Well if no riffs are magically coming from your mind through your fingers and into your guitar, I advise you to make 3 steps:
1) Learn basic theory. Learn the E major, E minor, A major, and A minor chord forms, the notes of your fretboard, and how to move the 4 chord forms up and down as barre chords. Learn about chord progressions and make up some simple chord progressions of your own and add some funk to them.
2) Learn your major and minor scales. It's not too hard, it's just a pattern. Learn to play an A major scale over an A major chord, and likewise for other scales/chords.
3) Set up a drum/bass beat with other musicians or a computer program. Set up a chord progression and simply play. With this basic knowledge, ideas should soar. Hope that helps!
#7
Quote by ManInTheBox77
Zepp: how much music theory is necesary (probably spelled that wrong) to right a good song?

Oct: i want to write both slow paced and then be able to write a badass in your face song

well you should know what notes and chords sound good together, and also scales, and you should know how to change the song up and keep it from being boring.

thats about as basic as I can get with it. Just keep practicing and keep learning, and It will come to you.

edit:it looks like someone beat me to it.
#8
so basically what im getting is that some sort of music theory knowledge is necesary for writing good songs?

if so, is there anywhere to learn this without having to hire someone to give you lessons?
#9
Quote by ManInTheBox77
so basically what im getting is that some sort of music theory knowledge is necesary for writing good songs?

if so, is there anywhere to learn this without having to hire someone to give you lessons?

I say you should check the lessons section on this site. some of them are really great lessons, and they can teach you a lot.
#10
ok and one more thing

there is a lady i jus did some work for and she teaches piano

is there anyway i can benifit from that if shes willing to teach me stuff??
#11
all the theory is basically the same, its just being able to transfer it to guitar terms that could be difficult
#12
Quote by ManInTheBox77
ok and one more thing

there is a lady i jus did some work for and she teaches piano

is there anyway i can benifit from that if shes willing to teach me stuff??

it would work if you could figure out how to transfer the piano notes to guitar.
#13
There's no reason not to take advantage of the opportunity and learn anything you can from her.

Perhaps at some point you'll want to play piano, if you don't already?

Regardless, there's no point in not taking advantage of direct access to teaching.
Genius may have its limitations; stupidity is not thus handicapped.
#14
Quote by ObsceneGestures
There's no reason not to take advantage of the opportunity and learn anything you can from her.

Perhaps at some point you'll want to play piano, if you don't already?

Regardless, there's no point in not taking advantage of direct access to teaching.

thats very true. anything you learn about music can help.

I know neo-classical guitar players learn violin scales, and incorperate those into their playing.
#15
is it really that hard to transfer what i learn on piano to guitar??

and this might be a stupid question so dont go ape **** if it is.

but do u play the same scales and chords (or whatever they are called on piano if they aren called chords) on piano an guitar? is there a big difference between guitar and piano?

once again im new to the whole music theory thing so dont rag on me cuz i dont kno this stuff..
#16
No, all chords and scales are composed of the same notes, no matter what instrument. Also, you can play anything that a piano can except for some large stretches (because of the way the guitar is made) and chords with more then six notes (for obvious reasons).

As for the songwriting, you don't necessarily need theory to write them, but it damn sure helps. I would be amazed if someone wrote a song using no theory at all.

Don't think of theory as something that defines what sounds good, it simply explains why something sounds good (most the time, blues makes no theoretical sense).

Hope that helped.
#18
Train your ear. When you learn a new chord, a new scale, a new anything, make sure instead of just knowing the numbers and letters behind it, you know how it sounds. Someone can know a million fun facts about the major scale and not be able to use it effectively if they don't spend enough time getting familiar with the sound in detail.

Yes you can. Chords are generally defined as any group of 3 or more notes played simultaneously. Obviously that is possible on both instruments. All theory concepts are, in fact, universal for Western musical instruments. There is a big difference between playing the instruments, but music theory applies to both.
#19
There is no set amount of theory that is required to write a good song. Some players learn by ear naturally and can sense song structure and never need to consult a book. You are like me you dont have this natural ability so go to musictheory.net and start on lesson 1 and go from there. Its a really good site it has good lessons and some training quiz aides.