#1
Hey guys, I have EZdrummer, and I don't have a MIDI controller. I want to get one someday, but can't at the moment.

Anyways, I've been wanting to make my own drum beats using GP5 but I don't understand notation all that well and I don't understand the time format for the drum beats. I have no experience with notation and getting the right timing. So I figured it would be great for me to learn, besides I'm a quick learning in most things musically.

So is there a time signature that is commonly used for drummers? Any help on this would be appreciated.

Also this would be much more preferred, but is there an actual software/program that is used like a MIDI controller?

Thanks.
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Equipment:
Epiphone Les Paul Classic Quilt Top
GHS Boomers 0.11
VOX AD50VT
Digitech Rp70
Dunlop CryBaby
#2
Quote by GSanthony4458
Anyways, I've been wanting to make my own drum beats using GP5 but I don't understand notation all that well and I don't understand the time format for the drum beats. I have no experience with notation and getting the right timing. So I figured it would be great for me to learn, besides I'm a quick learning in most things musically.


If you have no experience with notation at all then programming your own beats in something like GP5 will be a long and frustrating process. Unless you've understood how the notation of your chosen instrument works, at least rhythmically, you have precious little hope of getting good beats without a fair bit of luck or some detailed instruction.

Quote by GSanthony4458
So is there a time signature that is commonly used for drummers?


There are no "drum time signatures" any more than there are "guitar time signatures". Time signatures applies to music and the general pulse of the music defines the time signature. And since notation is, to a certain degree, down to personal preference there will be differences in how people notate. That said, by far the most common time signature in rock/pop/metal is 4/4.
#3
Why would you need to know notation to write in GP5, just use tabs i.e. 40 is the snare and 36 is the kick etc.
#4
Quote by ixelion
Why would you need to know notation to write in GP5, just use tabs i.e. 40 is the snare and 36 is the kick etc.


Because notation is also rhythmic notation, it's not all about pitches. If you don't know a quarter-note from a hole in the ground it is harder to program drums in GP5.
#5
Thanks for the replies, I guess I'll just have to do some research on understanding notation.

And ixelion, I wish it could be simple to just put the number for the drum parts and hear a beat but the timing would be all off. Therefor that is why I'm asking these questions.
myspace.com/realignedriffs
myspace.com/anthony4458

Equipment:
Epiphone Les Paul Classic Quilt Top
GHS Boomers 0.11
VOX AD50VT
Digitech Rp70
Dunlop CryBaby
#6
Ah I some times I take this type of knowledge for granted, in that case ebon would be right you will have a hard time doing this without understanding notation.

However it is really easy to learn I think all you really have to know is the different note subdivisions. Also you have to use the kit properly for note emphasis and establish rhythm.

Then again I am pretty terrible at programming, so someone else can probably give you better advice.

This might help
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(music)