#1
Hey, I play my big unfriendly acoustic as often as my shiny strat...do you guys use different picking-hand techniques for these two situations? A lot of advice, such as angling your pick, makes the acoustic sound a bit crap.

Additionally, when playing the high strings, do you allow your hand/wrist to touch the other strings? I feel I may be worried over this unnecessarily, rarely do you actually have to let the other strings ring while playing difficult lead on the high strings, and I can probably practice those situations as they come. But do you always leave all strings untouched?

Lastly, how do you tremolo pick chords? Do you for this case allow for more forearm movement, do only forearm movement, or stick to wrist movement just sweeping it widely accross all strings?
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#2
I use the same picking technique for both.

I mute all lower strings out of convenience. If you're playing with distortion, you don't want a bunch of harmonics ringing out.

Tremolo pick however you like, don't force yourself to restrain arm movement. I think you kind of have to move your arm for chords because you're going across all six strings.
#3
i don't have an acoustic myself, but i've played on one some times, and no, i do exactly the same thing as in an electric. it's pretty much the same really. i've never even found the 'acoustic being harder to play than electric' thing to be true.
2- my hand is always muting the lower strings which aren't being played.
3- it's always, ALWAYS all wrist motion. you gotta be more careful than when tremolo picking a single string tho. there's a lot more movement going on, and you can end up hurting your wrist. start slow and easy like in every kind of practice.
#4
^ RCalisto is pretty much dead on, your technique should be virtually the same for both instruments. if your acoustic feels harder to play check your string gauge and string height as i've noticed acoustics tend to have the strings sitting higher normally than electrics do.
#5
Quote by z4twenny
^ RCalisto is pretty much dead on, your technique should be virtually the same for both instruments. if your acoustic feels harder to play check your string gauge and string height as i've noticed acoustics tend to have the strings sitting higher normally than electrics do.


I agree with 2- that's how you play _when you play with a pick_. I actually have a callus at the base of my right hand from muting. But you can't do that when you use your fingers, as the base of the hand is way to high to mute the strings. I often mute with my fingertips in this case.

1 and 3 are off though. It's hard to compare playing a Spanish guitar to playing an electric, but to the degree that you can, playing the Spanish is much more difficult. Much, much more difficult. Steel string acoustics fall in the middle.

As for 3, there are guitarists who play well using all three methods of alternate picking- i.e., mostly from the fingers (apparently George Benson plays this way), mostly from the wrist, and mostly from the elbow. I do play mostly from the wrist, but there are times that I use a lot of elbow- mainly when making large string skips. At any rate, there just isn't an established plectrum pedagogy that says "only from the wrist."
#6
The acoustic trouble I'm referring to is that angling your pick changes the tone more significantly on an acoustic guitar. I don't feel like it necessarily sounds propper and good that way. However, this is something that's pretty much always stated as a picking technique to improve speed, because the string doesn't hold up your pick.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
#7
Quote by sirpsycho85
The acoustic trouble I'm referring to is that angling your pick changes the tone more significantly on an acoustic guitar. I don't feel like it necessarily sounds propper and good that way. However, this is something that's pretty much always stated as a picking technique to improve speed, because the string doesn't hold up your pick.


then would you re-angle your pick each time you change from downstroke to upstroke? lol
trust me when i say this: angling your pick does nothing but ruining upstroke tone. i myself never angle my pick (only when playing stuff like metallica - all downstrokes pretty much) and i can pick very quickly. quicker than my left hand can fret
#8
Quote by z4twenny
^ RCalisto is pretty much dead on, your technique should be virtually the same for both instruments. if your acoustic feels harder to play check your string gauge and string height as i've noticed acoustics tend to have the strings sitting higher normally than electrics do.


Yeah, I agree. And how the hell do you change an acoustic's action?! Cuz I am thinking about just buying a better acoustic with lower action, but is there any simple way to lower it?
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