#1
Alright, our band is in the process of recording our first album. It will probably have 9 or 10 songs on it and clock in at a good amount of time. When we release it, we're going to release it at a show with a well known local band to help draw people. Here's my questions about the album:

1. How much of an investment should we put into it? I've seen places that will make professional copies (jewel case, color labels and inserts, color printed discs, etc.) for $2.50 a disc but you have to buy in sets of 100.

2. How much does quality matter on it? We're recording it ourselves but it sounds quite nice (they aren't up on my band's profile yet but think kinda of early Jimi Hendrix stuff but maybe a bit fuller sounding)

3. Even if people come for the better known band, will it still help us get fans and sell albums?

4. Any other suggestions?
#2
Investment is totally up to you and depends on how many you want to sell.

As for question 3, I'd say it depends on how you perform, if you do well, the other bands fans might buy your CD.
#3
1. It depends on how realistically you expect it to do. If it has a chance of doing really well, go that extra mile to make sure yours looks pro.

2. Quality doesn't matter as much if your songs are great, but lots of people will say you sound bad if your recordings sound bad. So you should make sure it's pretty good. If people know it's a demo then they will be more lenient.

3. Of course, just having any exposure at all helps. My band purposely made a controversial cover, then called a bunch of news networks saying it was disrespectful and blasphemous just so they would put it on the news and help us get attention.

4. Be prepared for people to not be as into it as you are. We've made many self produced albums and unless you have a large fan base, a lot of those albums ended up selling maybe 100 copies. Good luck though man, just keep trying.
#4
buy 100 copies, and if they all sell, buy more.

That way, you're not looking at a huge loss of money and 400 CDs sitting there if it doesnt sell as well as hoped.
#5
Quote by altgrunge
1. It depends on how realistically you expect it to do. If it has a chance of doing really well, go that extra mile to make sure yours looks pro.

2. Quality doesn't matter as much if your songs are great, but lots of people will say you sound bad if your recordings sound bad. So you should make sure it's pretty good. If people know it's a demo then they will be more lenient.

3. Of course, just having any exposure at all helps. My band purposely made a controversial cover, then called a bunch of news networks saying it was disrespectful and blasphemous just so they would put it on the news and help us get attention.

4. Be prepared for people to not be as into it as you are. We've made many self produced albums and unless you have a large fan base, a lot of those albums ended up selling maybe 100 copies. Good luck though man, just keep trying.


thats the best idea ever! im definitely doing that lol.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#6
1. Realistically assess how many you think you'll be able to sell. The more you get made, the cheaper they are per copy. If you take Gargan's advice, and sell 500 copies (be honest... will you?), then your cost comes in at $1250. Whereas, if you just bought five hundred all at once, they'd probably be around $1000. The price and deal you have quoted sounds good if their product is good, though.

2. You want people to buy these, then. How much does quality matter to you? If you went out to see a band and you thought they were good, so you bought their CD, brought it home, put it in to listen to and it sounded like a demo, how would YOU feel? Myself, I'd feel like I just got ripped off.

If it IS a demo, then just have it available for free download, or don't distribute it at all if you don't want to give it away. If it is a product you want people to buy - in other words, a commercial product - make sure it is competitive with other CDs they'll pay money for.

3. Of course! That's why you do it, right?

4. I have an article around here.... lemme see if I can find it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
thats the best idea ever! im definitely doing that lol.


Don't. It's overdone. Unless you're in a small hick town, these days, the media won't give half a crap about some band nobody has ever heard of releasing a CD with an offensive cover.

altgrunge - you're 18? How many albums have you released?? Your wording sounds like you've released a bunch.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by axemanchris
1. Realistically assess how many you think you'll be able to sell. The more you get made, the cheaper they are per copy. If you take Gargan's advice, and sell 500 copies (be honest... will you?), then your cost comes in at $1250. Whereas, if you just bought five hundred all at once, they'd probably be around $1000. The price and deal you have quoted sounds good if their product is good, though.


I don't know how good the product is. It seems good but I don't know of anyone that's used them before. Here's the website:http://www.diskfaktory.com/default.asp
There's another place I know of that I can vouch for a bit more but they charge about a dollar more for the same thing.


Quote by axemanchris
If it IS a demo, then just have it available for free download, or don't distribute it at all if you don't want to give it away. If it is a product you want people to buy - in other words, a commercial product - make sure it is competitive with other CDs they'll pay money for.


I'm actually not sure if people would consider it a demo or not. I mean, it's not professional, studio grade stuff but it's not just some cheap 1 mic recording either. It's just kinda in the middle. I could post up a clip of one of our songs if that would help.
Last edited by sumguy67 at Aug 5, 2008,
#9
If they are who I think they are (or in other words, if memory serves me correctly), then they're pretty reputable. Google them and find out. We went with Hypnotic Duplication for ours, and it was fantastic. They outsource their stuff to Sony who does all the major label stuff. You can't, as an artist, deal direct with Sony, though, so the middle man is a necessary evil. They were really, really helpful, going above and beyond every step of the way. When we do our next CD, we'll go with them for sure. www.hypnoticduplication.com

Sure, I'll tell you how good the sound quality is, in my opinion if you like. It can be hard to be objective with your own material. but you really have to try to learn to be, or to find someone who will be brutally honest with you.

Try this.... put on a commercial recording back to back with your own recording. Switch back and forth. Does it sound like a commercial product that YOU have bought?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
I must say that is a pretty good price for them. Too bad they don't have US prices up there yet.

Alright, it's up on my band's profile now under "My Favorite One Short Demo". It's just a piece of the guitar and drums raw tracks because that's all I could pull from it right now. The other songs on the profile were recorded a long time ago so they aren't part of what we're looking at doing now. I know that the song obviously isn't professional grade but I don't know if it's bad enough to market as a demo or not.
#11
It's going in the right direction. That's good, because a clip like that can often yield the "not in the ballpark" rating. That said.... it really is too early to tell for sure.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Alright then, cool. I wish I had a better clip but I haven't been able to record with our keyboardist or bassist in a while so that was all I had from what would go on our album.
#14
Put your album on mp3.com and put the downloading link on your myspace and promote that