#1
Well, I dunno if I'm doing this right. I used to pick with my hand in a palm muting position (sort of like, muting the low E and the A string, sorry I don't know how to explain), and after doing some research, I decided to change to the floating hand position.

Unfortunately I just had to stumble upon the question, is having my forearm resting on the edge + this sort of weird part of the Ibanez RG body (the part thats sort of tilted back) considered anchoring? So should my right hand be completely off the guitar? (Besides my right hand on the strings to mute excess noise of course)

Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in advance.
Last edited by Raiace at Aug 5, 2008,
#2
Quote by Raiace
Well, I dunno if I'm doing this right. I used to pick with my hand in a palm muting position (sort of like, muting the low E and the A string, sorry I don't know how to explain), and after doing some research, I decided to change to the floating hand position.

Unfortunately I just had to stumble upon the question, is having my forearm resting on the edge + this sort of weird part of the Ibanez RG body (the part thats sort of tilted back) considered anchoring? So should my right hand be completely off the guitar? (Besides my right hand on the strings to mute excess noise of course)

Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in advance.


If you're asking whether your arm should float completely free of the guitar, even strict classical technique doesn't ask that of you. You're going to need to anchor something to get some stability. You just want to restrict your mobility as little as possible. On a guitar with a deep body letting the forearm rest on the side of the guitar, or the transition from side to top, is the normal thing, but on a thin electric you will almost inevitably wind up with some forearm on the top of the guitar. As long as you can move freely it's not a problem, IMHO.

The main thing to avoid is anchoring RH fingers on the far side of the strings. It's reasonable to rest your hand on the bridge on electric- I only do that when I am palm muting, but I palm mute quite a lot... I also use the base of the blade of my right hand to mute strings below those I am playing, and that gives me some stability, so it could be considered anchoring as well. I think this is OK, and actually pretty necessary to dampen sympathetic viobration in those strings at high volume. It would be very poor classical technique.
#3
Yep, I was asking if my right hand should float completely free. Thanks for the help.
#4
I play on a pretty bad quality strat copy, and I've tried to take my hand off of the guitar comletely, but it just doesn't work. The guitar just rocked back and forth on my leg, and instead of using my left hand to fret the notes, I had to use it to hold the guitar.

I don't think too much harm if any can be done by resting your forearm on the guitar.
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#6
i do the same thing but i think it's the easiest way to play a les paul coz of the arch top
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#7
Quote by mezzopiano
If you're asking whether your arm should float completely free of the guitar, even strict classical technique doesn't ask that of you. You're going to need to anchor something to get some stability. You just want to restrict your mobility as little as possible. On a guitar with a deep body letting the forearm rest on the side of the guitar, or the transition from side to top, is the normal thing, but on a thin electric you will almost inevitably wind up with some forearm on the top of the guitar. As long as you can move freely it's not a problem, IMHO.

The main thing to avoid is anchoring RH fingers on the far side of the strings. It's reasonable to rest your hand on the bridge on electric- I only do that when I am palm muting, but I palm mute quite a lot... I also use the base of the blade of my right hand to mute strings below those I am playing, and that gives me some stability, so it could be considered anchoring as well. I think this is OK, and actually pretty necessary to dampen sympathetic viobration in those strings at high volume. It would be very poor classical technique.


Nice answer.


Lots of people seem to be confused about muting and anchoring. It's pretty simple.
Unplug your guitar or put it on a clean setting. Now, practice picking without
touching the guitar.

When you want to practice your muting, set your equipment for the usual amount
of god-awful gain and distortion you like to use, and mute away.

The goal of no anchor practice, is to learn to free your hand so that you aren't
DEPENDENT on resting it to pick, and NOT that you never touch the guitar.
#8
^ yup, its ok to touch the guitar, theres nothing wrong with that as it's going to happen. the problem arrives when you cant play without having some part of your hand/arm held in place to play cleanly.
#9
Go to your mother's medicine cabinet and grab some pills (oxycodone, vicodin, percocet, etc.). Take 2x-3x the recommended amount. You'll be ****ed and sleep well.