#1
How do you guys develop your knowledge of what note is where on the fretboard? Is there a number theory thats easy to use? Do you just memorize a few referance points and go from there? I have gotten good at learning "box" scales, but I find these limiting when improvising, so I'd like to learn how to form scales (which I sort of have, need a little more work), then know where these scales are on the frets, everywhere. Just let me know what you guys do, as I'm sure this isn't a new idea.
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#2
Well. Learn your open note names first.

1.E
2.B
3.G
4.D
5.A
6.E

1-6 from thinnest to fattest. Then just start at that note and recite the alphabet. Say you start at the open note on the fat string. ( There are sharps or flats between each note, except B to C and except for E to F. )

[font="Courier New"]
E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E
0 1 2 3  4 5  6 7  8 9 10 11 12 [/FONT] 
#3
Well, when I started, I memorised all the reference points I could. Firstly, all the notes on the low E string (since when you learn it, you already know 1/3 of the fretboard), then I kept in mind that the 5th fret on a string is the same as a higher open string, the 7th fret is the same as a lower open string (just an octave higher), and then I learned that the B string is like all other strings, but like a half step higher.

Though of course, eventually, you will learn all the notes and know like your ABC ;] Playing music from sheets rather than tabs also helps a lot to learn the notes.

Also, you should learn the three basic shapes of an octave interval, they help incredibly when improvising to find the needed intervals, transposing licks and whatnot.

Here are all octave shapes from every string of the C note (1 octave):

e|-----|
B|-----|
G|-----|
D|---10|
A|-----|
E|-8---|

e|-----|
B|-----|
G|---5-|
D|-----|
A|-3---|
E|-----|

e|-----|
B|---13|
G|-----|
D|-10--|
A|-----|
E|-----|

e|---8-|
B|-----|
G|-5---|
D|-----|
A|-----|
E|-----|

e|-----|
B|-----|
G|---5-|
D|-----|
A|-----|
E|-8---|

e|-----|
B|---1-|
G|-----|
D|-----|
A|-3---|
E|-----|

e|---8-|
B|-----|
G|-----|
D|-10--|
A|-----|
E|-----|
Last edited by UNIe at Aug 5, 2008,
#4
Learn all the open strings.

Look at how the fifth fret is equal to the next string open except from G to B which is the fourth fret.

Now you have a 2 references.

The twelve fret = Fret 0.

That's three references.

Do you know any basic chords? Learn the notes that are in basic open chords and you'll realize you know almost all the frets between 0 and 5.


Now notice how if you skip a string and go up two frets, you get a note that's the same pitch only higher. This is called an octave. The note is the same name.

So now you have TONS of references all over the place.

You can also skip two strings and go down three frets!

Now you have gazzillions of reference points.

The fretboard doesn't look so big any more does it? . You just got to take it slow and keep at it. Suddenly you'll be doing it in your sleep.
#5
Ya these are kind of the responses I expected. I know my open strings and most of the E string (from learning bar chords). I know how to manually "count" my way to find a note, I was just wondering if there was any "trick" rather than just constant practice. I guess I should have realized as is the case with most things in guitar, the only way to get good at it is to do it....


So once I've got that (I doubt it will take longer than a few weeks to get the hang of it, with the help of some of your tips). How do you use intervals to determine scales "on the fly?" I know how to form a scale in any root note based on intervals, however this is more like me sitting down to do calculus than it is an improv technique. Do you guys just know most of the scales or are you able to work out any scale in your head easily?
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#6
Quote by ACDCrule



WOW, sorry to double post, but that is the best thing I could have possibly gotten out of this post. Not to discredit the other tips, but WOW, what a great tool.
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#7
Learn the major scale. But don't just learn a position of it. Learn what intervals make it up, what steps make it up, the chords derived from it and play it. A LOT.


Once you really know the major scale well off, so many more things start clicking. I remember I used to think I new the major scale but I had no idea. Now I can play almost anything I want thanks to it.


Almost, though, because there's always something new to learn.
#8
I've been learning intervals and scales, but I like the sound of blues pentatonic and harmonic minors alot better so I mostly PLAY them. So you would suggest learning the major scale then learning how that is augmented into the other scales? As in what notes are added/subtracted using the major as a base?
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#9
Exactly! You can derive virtually all scales from changing the major scale. So if you really know your major scale you'll start seeing the other scales very quickly.
#11
wait what? theres a b# in a C# scale? b# as in not C? dammit, whyd you have to pull the rug out from under me
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BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#12
B# and E# DO exist. They are enharmonic tones for C and F. They are there and real.

In F# major: F# G# A# B# C# D# E

In C# major: C# D# E# F# G# A# B#
#13
Ya I understand enharmonics, but why in the notation would you not just say C not B# or F not E#? Do musicians just like to keep their club as exclusive as possible so they make **** make no sense?
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BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#14
Quote by tubetime86
Ya I understand enharmonics, but why in the notation would you not just say C not B# or F not E#? Do musicians just like to keep their club as exclusive as possible so they make **** make no sense?


When writing out major scales, each letter is used only once (can be sharp, flat, or natural) So to keep this convention in tact you'll get B# & E# when dealing with scales like C# major
#15
O gotcha, thats not so hard. So is that the rule of thumb for when you use flats verses sharps etc? Just use each note only once? I tend to prefer writing things as sharps, for absolutely no good reason, should I be following some rule on that other than ^?
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#16
Becuase if they didn't use the sharps then

C# Major would be C# D# F F# G A C

and notice how you have two C's and two F's? You only want one of every note in a major scale. That is why there are double sharps and double flats, also.

EDIT: I'm a little late....
The name's Austin
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Without music life would be a mistake.
#17
Quote by tubetime86
O gotcha, thats not so hard. So is that the rule of thumb for when you use flats verses sharps etc? Just use each note only once? I tend to prefer writing things as sharps, for absolutely no good reason, should I be following some rule on that other than ^?


Yeah well whether you use sharps or flats depends on the key, so with something like C#major you could write it out in Db instead so you would have 5 flats there instead of 7 sharps with the C#major scale. Ideally when notating it's best to make it as straightforward as possible

edit, this may be helpful http://www.jazclass.aust.com/scales/scamaj.htm
Last edited by Stash Jam at Aug 5, 2008,
#18
Sorry to upstage you, "www.all-guitar-chords.com" best site on the web for us UGers... yes even better than ug (dont ban me)
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Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#20
Quote by tubetime86
Sorry to upstage you, "www.all-guitar-chords.com" best site on the web for us UGers... yes even better than ug (dont ban me)



uhmm, that link doesn't spell the C#/Db major scales correctly... did you mean to post that in a different thread or something?
#21
what you mean spell the scales? is that site wrong? most of what I know is based on that site so I wouldnt know if it was.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#22
Quote by tubetime86
what you mean spell the scales? is that site wrong? most of what I know is based on that site so I wouldnt know if it was.


remember on the 1st page of this thread we were talking about C# major being spelled/notated/written as C# D# E# F# G# A# B#?

your last response didn't make any sense so I thought you meant to post it somewhere else ... Here's a recap,

Quote by tubetime86
O gotcha, thats not so hard. So is that the rule of thumb for when you use flats verses sharps etc? Just use each note only once? I tend to prefer writing things as sharps, for absolutely no good reason, should I be following some rule on that other than ^?


Quote by Stash Jam
Yeah well whether you use sharps or flats depends on the key, so with something like C#major you could write it out in Db instead so you would have 5 flats there instead of 7 sharps with the C#major scale. Ideally when notating it's best to make it as straightforward as possible

edit, this may be helpful http://www.jazclass.aust.com/scales/scamaj.htm


Quote by tubetime86
Sorry to upstage you, "www.all-guitar-chords.com" best site on the web for us UGers... yes even better than ug (dont ban me)
#23
O thats just cuz i looked at the link he put up and it was similar but poorly organized.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!