#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rACYawtEDKw

^ At 2:18 in the video, Alexi plays the ending to the first solo. I have the GP tab, and according to it this song is in 12/8 time signature and the ending lick that is heard at 2:18 is sixteenth notes. How exactly can I relate a 12/8 time signature to common time, which I am most used to?

I am simply having trouble with how to think of a 12/8 time in my head. Like when playing sixteenth notes of a 4/4 time, it's quite simple. But I'm not sure how to visualize this, if you will.

Sorry if this question is confusing, because I myself am actually not quite sure how to ask it
#2
So, when playing the "sixteenth notes" of a 12/8 time, should I be thinking of them simply as three groupings of six sixteenths per measure? Or should I be thinking of them as sextuplets? Stuff like this confuses me lol.

--edit: Hey where'd your post go?
#3
Sorry! I deleted it thinking it was wrong but it's right!


In 12/8 you have a dotted quarter note per beat(3 eight notes if you want) so that leaves for six sixteenth notes in a beat.

Try work with that relation. The six sixteenth notes from 12/8 would relate to a sextuplet in 4/4.

To answer your question, try count subdividing the beat(as in, rather than tapping your foot every beat, this being every dotted quarter, try tap on every eight notes, so three taps per beat).


EDIT: Try this, get a metronome and put it at a slowish speed. Say 60. Now just on every click, count. So 1 2 3 4 would be click click click click. When you say the 1, try to feel the three eight notes in each beat. Then count the three eight notes, so 123 123 123 123 and you'll realize you get this sort of jumpy or light feel. Then count 123456 123456 123456 123456.


Make sure it all lands perfectly on the beat. That's a 12/8 counting dotter quarter notes, eight notes and sixteenth notes.
Last edited by confusius at Aug 5, 2008,
#5
No, your ultimate goal should be to be able to count the 12/8 with it's triplet feel without having to think it about it. That's going to take some work but it will come.

See, 4/4 has binary subdivision, whilst 12/8 has ternary subdivision. In the first each part is divided into 2, and in the second each part is divided into 3 so this gives the time sig a completely different feel.
#6
What about when a four-note pattern is played in this triplet-feel 12/8 time, like the solo that I mentioned and linked above? Should I be accenting notes in a 1-2-3-4 pattern or still keep the triplet accenting/feel?
#7
Quote by fixationdarknes
What about when a four-note pattern is played in this triplet-feel 12/8 time, like the solo that I mentioned and linked above? Should I be accenting notes in a 1-2-3-4 pattern or still keep the triplet accenting/feel?


Bump? Sorry I'm still having some issues with this. It feels weird to think of a triplet rhythm when playing a four-note pattern. Do I just have to get used to that or should I think of it as a fast four-note pattern that is sorta displaced from the actual measures.

Thanks.
#8
Quote by fixationdarknes
Bump? Sorry I'm still having some issues with this. It feels weird to think of a triplet rhythm when playing a four-note pattern. Do I just have to get used to that or should I think of it as a fast four-note pattern that is sorta displaced from the actual measures.

Thanks.


Bumping, as I'm still having problems.
#9
It's four notes in the time of three, instead of the triplet where you play 3 notes in the time of 4 (four 16th-notes=two 8th-notes=one 8th-note triplet).

Now that I've done the nice thing and answered your question, I won't feel bad about the following:

*reported*
For bumping/spamming
#10
^ tbh, what you've said doesn't really help him either.


Anyway, simple answer, feeling semiquavers in compound time is like feeling triplets in simple time - a skill you develop. Do it more often! How many songs do you play in compound time atm? Play a few, improvise 16th feel licks through them. Repeat.