#1
I'm doing a Grade Two Music Rudiments Workbook and it's telling me to write a D# Minor Melodic Scale from Submediant to Submediant ascending and descending, in the tenor clef and to use the correct key signatures.

Would I use the key signature from the D# minor scale for this? Or is there something I have to change?
#2
If it's in D# minor then use the D# minor key signiature.

Why would you have to change anything?
#3
Don't change the key signature, just start on the 6th note and end there. So B# to B# and back down to B-natural since you're supposed to restore the sharpened 6th and 7th note when descending in melodic minor.
#4
I'm not sure...I just thought maybe because if I'm writing the D# Minor Melodic...thanks for the answer
#5
Quote by Chaos669
I'm doing a Grade Two Music Rudiments Workbook and it's telling me to write a D# Minor Melodic Scale from Submediant to Submediant ascending and descending, in the tenor clef and to use the correct key signatures.

Would I use the key signature from the D# minor scale for this? Or is there something I have to change?

  • D# minor is the relative minor of F# major. Hence, the key signature for D# minor is six sharps (F#, C#, G#, D#, A# & E#).
  • The melodic minor scale uses the raised sixth and seventh scale degrees ascending and reverts to the natural minor descending. In the key of D# minor, this would produce these tones ascending - D# E# F# G# A# B# CX D#, and these tones descending - D# C# B A# G# F# E# D#
  • If I understand the instructions, you're to start and end the scale on the submediant, or sixth, scale degree. You would therefore use the notes listed above, but start and end the ascending and descending scales on F#.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#6
Quote by gpb0216
  • D# minor is the relative minor of F# major. Hence, the key signature for D# minor is six sharps (F#, C#, G#, D#, A# & E#).
  • The melodic minor scale uses the raised sixth and seventh scale degrees ascending and reverts to the natural minor descending. In the key of D# minor, this would produce these tones ascending - D# E# F# G# A# B# CX D#, and these tones descending - D# C# B A# G# F# E# D#
  • If I understand the instructions, you're to start and end the scale on the submediant, or sixth, scale degree. You would therefore use the notes listed above, but start and end the ascending and descending scales on F#.


What, start and end on F#? no that's not the case.

To be honest I forgot the fact that the Melodic Minor Scale differs when it's descending...so ascending I would use the regular Melodic Minor Scale, and descending use the regular Minor scale?
#7
Quote by gpb0216
  • If I understand the instructions, you're to start and end the scale on the submediant, or sixth, scale degree. You would therefore use the notes listed above, but start and end the ascending and descending scales on F#.


I'm confused, does submediant refer to the 6th scale degree of D# melodic minor or the 6th scale degree of its relative major? If it's the 6th scale degree of F# major then that would mean starting and ending on D#.
#8
Quote by pwrmax
I'm confused, does submediant refer to the 6th scale degree of D# melodic minor or the 6th scale degree of its relative major? If it's the 6th scale degree of F# major then that would mean starting and ending on D#.


The submediant is the sixth degree of whatever scale you happen to be playing (Assuming that it's diatonic. In synthetic scales, specific scale degrees may not behave the same way they do in the major and minor scales)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
The submediant is the sixth degree of whatever scale you happen to be playing (Assuming that it's diatonic. In synthetic scales, specific scale degrees may not behave the same way they do in the major and minor scales)


Ok, well then in that case start and end on B# ascending and descend back down to B.
#10
Okay, but can someone clarify that the Minor Melodic Scale has a raised 6th and 7th scale degree ascending, but is just a regular Minor Scale descending? Or is it different?
#11
Quote by Chaos669
Okay, but can someone clarify that the Minor Melodic Scale has a raised 6th and 7th scale degree ascending, but is just a regular Minor Scale descending? Or is it different?


You are correct, though it is very commonly played the same way ascending and descending.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by pwrmax
I'm confused, does submediant refer to the 6th scale degree of D# melodic minor or the 6th scale degree of its relative major? If it's the 6th scale degree of F# major then that would mean starting and ending on D#.
I clearly goofed, and Chaos669 caught it. The submediant of the D# melodic minor scale is B#.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#13
Thanks for all the help guys, I understand now

EDIT: I wrote ascending: C, D, D#, E#, F#, G#, A#, C
descending: B, A#, G#, F#, E#, D#, C#, B

Is this correct? Sorry for burdening you.
Last edited by Chaos669 at Aug 5, 2008,
#14
Quote by Chaos669
Thanks for all the help guys, I understand now

EDIT: I wrote ascending: C, D, D#, E#, F#, G#, A#, C
descending: B, A#, G#, F#, E#, D#, C#, B

Is this correct? Sorry for burdening you.


It should be B# instead of C and CX (double sharp) instead of D for the ascending.
#16
Dammit, now I have to write the G Minor Melodic...I tried and I couldn't find a way to write it ascending without repeating a letter....help?

Sorry for double post.
#17
Quote by Chaos669
Dammit, now I have to write the G Minor Melodic...I tried and I couldn't find a way to write it ascending without repeating a letter....help?

Sorry for double post.


Depending on the key, harmonic and melodic minor may require the use of a double sharp.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by Chaos669
Doesn't the G Minor Melodic use flats?


G minor does. G melodic minor requires the use of a sharp as well. This may seem strange, but keep in mind that melodic minor's alterations will be expressed as accidentals, not as an actual key signature. The use of sharped notes is perfectly fine.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.