#1
when i improvise over a chord progression, i always having trouble fluidly and flawlessly switching between two (or more) different minor pentatonics. it never sounds like a melodic transition. i listen and watch all these great famous and talented players and they just transition between pentatonics so melodicly and smooth. same goes for arpeggios and other scales. when im switching, i pretty much just pick a random note in that scale/arpeggio or w/e and slide to it. i either do that or i pick a note that both of the scales have in common and i just switch using that.

anyone know any good techniques to switch from scale to scale in the middle of an improvised solo?
#2
you've got to keep in mind that when using modes the whole 'band' has got to change mode with you to the next one, or it just sounds off.
#3
Quote by RCalisto
you've got to keep in mind that when using modes the whole 'band' has got to change mode with you to the next one, or it just sounds off.


What? He's not talking about modes, he's talking about positions. Modes have nothing to do with this.

TS: There's no trick to it, it just takes time to get comfortable moving around the fretboard. I advise picking some of your favorite guitarists and studying their solos to see just how they do it. Try starting slowly and creating a few short lines that make use of notes from different patterns.
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#5
Most players don't switch between different scales, they just play the same scale in different positions.
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#7
Quote by madshatter
then how do you solo over a chord progression?


Depends what key the song is in. If it's in E minor, use the E minor scale.
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#8
but then the chord changes and your supposed to solo with that scale, then it changes again and you solo with that scale. song have one chord in them. usually 4 chords that repeat through the whole song. at least that's what i've learned from the melodic control vid and other guitarists.
#9
Quote by madshatter
but then the chord changes and your supposed to solo with that scale, then it changes again and you solo with that scale. song have one chord in them. usually 4 chords that repeat through the whole song. at least that's what i've learned from the melodic control vid and other guitarists.


The scale doesn't change with each chord, nor does the tonal center. You can follow the chord tones if you want (though you are still playing within the same scale), but is almost unheard of outside of art music to change scales with every chord.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
The scale doesn't change with each chord, nor does the tonal center. You can follow the chord tones if you want (though you are still playing within the same scale), but is almost unheard of outside of art music to change scales with every chord.

+1

You might change which notes of the scale you emphasise over different chords, or chuck in a couple of different accidentals but you'll still be using the same scale.
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