#1
I was just on a website about theory and I was learning how to name whats in a Gm7b5 and I was confused about why sometimes you used B flat and other times you used A sharp or why you would use Gbb.Could someone please help explain why you would use one or the other. thanks for nay help
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#2
since B flat and A sharp are enharmonic, which means they are the same note different name, it just depends on what key signature you are in, say youre in F Major, you would use B flat because B is flated in the key signature, but if you were in B major you would use A sharp because the A is sharped in that key signature.
#4
I got this from someones sig, and it makes a good example...
for instance C# major:
C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#

notice the E# and B#, you would use this notation instead of just F and C
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#5
i have another quick question.how do you find out where to play B7b9.would you use the B major scale?
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#6
yes it would be based off the B major scale

so if e look at B major the scale is

B C# D# E F# G# A# B

to make the chord we use the intervals

1 3 5 b7 b9

B C# D# E F# G# A# B C#

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

so 1 is B

3 is D#

we bflatten the 7th (b7) so instead of it being A# it will just be A

and we b flatten the ninth (a major ninth is the same as a major second so the b9 (or b2) will be C

so the chord is B D# A C and it has to be made from the Bmajor scale even when played in a different key than Bmajor

EDIT i forgot to say in chords with extensions the fifth is optional and thus not notated in what i used because i usually leave it out you can put it in if you like it

the intervals are usually shown with the fifth (5) asoptional ex dominant7th 1 3 (5) b7

as you move up to 11 and 13 extensions the 5 7 and 9 and 11 are usualy shown as optional

ex dominant11- 1 3 (5) b7 (9) 11

dominant13 -1 3 (5) b7 (9) (11) 13
Last edited by lbc_sublime at Aug 6, 2008,
#7
thanks ibc sublime,thats what i thought,
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#8
Quote by lbc_sublime
yes it would be based off the B major scale


Well, since B7b9 is dominant you'd probably more likely look first to the scale
it's built on as a V7 chord. That would be E major. With the b9, that would
further suggest the V7 of E Harmonic minor. It all depends on the context
really.
#9
i promise this is my last question but does anyone know any good sites that have guitar chords like B7b9 and Cmaj7 and more that i can use to practice figuring out what notes are in the chord and where it is played and thanks everyone for the help
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When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
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#10
Quote by GuitarLesPaul
i promise this is my last question but does anyone know any good sites that have guitar chords like B7b9 and Cmaj7 and more that i can use to practice figuring out what notes are in the chord and where it is played and thanks everyone for the help


allguitarchords .com is your best bet.

I suggest you focus on learning the intervals that make up each chord, and then practice creating those chords in various inversions, everywhere on the neck. The ultimate goal is to become familiar enough with the fretboard that you're able to create any chord you want just by knowing the intervals (often contained in the name), even if you've never played it before in your life.
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#11
Quote by edg
Well, since B7b9 is dominant you'd probably more likely look first to the scale
it's built on as a V7 chord. That would be E major. With the b9, that would
further suggest the V7 of E Harmonic minor. It all depends on the context
really.



i don't quite understand what you are trying to say we are no talking about cadences we are talking about how to make a chord with B as the root.

and to make any chord you form it from the major scale of the root note.EDIT and you change the notes as the intervals for the chords specify
#12
thanks everyone,now its time to practice,practice and some more practice
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When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
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#13
i guess i lied cuz i got another question.i have been going through and finding out what notes are in Cmaj and Csus4 etc. now i am just sort of confused about how you know where to play the chord on the guitar.since you can play 6 versions of cmaj which one would you use and when?
Guitars:
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Alvarez 6 string acoustic
Alvarez 12 string acoustic/electric
B.C. Rich Warlock
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Ibanez 4 string bass


When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace
-Jimi Hendrix R.I.P
#14
Quote by GuitarLesPaul
i guess i lied cuz i got another question.i have been going through and finding out what notes are in Cmaj and Csus4 etc. now i am just sort of confused about how you know where to play the chord on the guitar.since you can play 6 versions of cmaj which one would you use and when?


The choice is up to you. Chords are simply collections of notes, and you can play those notes anywhere on the fretboard. Different inversions (chords with a note besides the root note in the bass) may sound different and behave differently (this is another, more complex topic entirely), but they are still the same chord.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Quote by lbc_sublime
i don't quite understand what you are trying to say we are no talking about cadences we are talking about how to make a chord with B as the root.


I think the original question was would you base a B7b9 off the B major scale.
Well, you *could*, but it's actually more likely to be coming from either E major or
E Harmonic minor as a basis scale.

It's got nothing to do with cadences, just likely context. A B7b9 based off of
B Major impliles that's a I chord and it's very unlikely that chord would be used as
a I.
#16
Quote by edg
I think the original question was would you base a B7b9 off the B major scale.
Well, you *could*, but it's actually more likely to be coming from either E major or
E Harmonic minor as a basis scale.

It's got nothing to do with cadences, just likely context. A B7b9 based off of
B Major impliles that's a I chord and it's very unlikely that chord would be used as
a I.



ahh i c thank you

i just thought he was talking about the forming the chord. as in how to make it and not so much what key is it used in

i am sure you can see my confusion.

but that is why i said i don't understand what you are saying