#1
I get an annoying buzzing sound from my guitar. Its the guitar and not the amp because my older guitar doesn't buzz at all.

What do i do?

I would rather do the DIY approach instead of paying some guy 50 bucks to solder a wire...

Thanks...
#2
Well, does it do when it is unplugged too?

If its just when its plugged in it is likely a grounding or insulation issue.
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#3
Quote by Øttər
Well, does it do when it is unplugged too?

If its just when its plugged in it is likely a grounding or insulation issue.


Thats what i thought.

Oh i should have mentioned that it doesn't buzz when i touch the metal part of the input jack. So is that the problem?

How do i go about fixing it?
#4
if you have an electrical meter, you can figure out what is grounded and what is not. I had a similar problem recently, and found out that by bridge was not grounded (I had assumed it was a pickup issue). The wire that connected my bridge to my volume pot had been severed, and after I fixed it, buzz stopped :P.

On another note, I found that one of my mysterious buzzes came from having the TV on :O.

edit: does it only stop when the output jack is touched? or does it stop whenever you touch the pickup mounts or any other parts? (sounds like a grounding thing though.
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Last edited by sacamano79 at Aug 6, 2008,
#5
if your playing close it can be feedback?
but maybe its just your pickups or maybe if its fret buzz it could be your truss rod.
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#6
Quote by sacamano79
if you have an electrical meter, you can figure out what is grounded and what is not. I had a similar problem recently, and found out that by bridge was not grounded (I had assumed it was a pickup issue). The wire that connected my bridge to my volume pot had been severed, and after I fixed it, buzz stopped :P.

On another note, I found that one of my mysterious buzzes came from having the TV on :O.

edit: does it only stop when the output jack is touched? or does it stop whenever you touch the pickup mounts or any other parts? (sounds like a grounding thing though.

Yes Yes and Yes. You stole what I was gonna tell him. Anyways if your reading this listen to this man he just may have solved your problem. Oh and loose wires not properly soldred to their coralating mounts will create a buzz also. Plus if its a humbucker its almost garenteed to buzz a bit.
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#7
Quote by Unherolike
Yes Yes and Yes. You stole what I was gonna tell him. Anyways if your reading this listen to this man he just may have solved your problem. Oh and loose wires not properly soldred to their coralating mounts will create a buzz also. Plus if its a humbucker its almost garenteed to buzz a bit.


I thought humbuckers were supposed to stop buzzing?

Anyways il get out my multi meter and have a look.
#8
Quote by Final !mpact
I thought humbuckers were supposed to stop buzzing?

Anyways il get out my multi meter and have a look.

Yeah but most have a tendencie to pickup signal from everthing. Like Tvs, Dvd players, phones, lights, none of which is that bad of a suspect. Also its how well a pickup is potted can dramaticaly alter hum. Sheilding helps quite hum also like when you see emgs (best example) with black covers typically have some form of sheilding material inside.
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#9
If you touch anything that's touching the grounds (strings, brigdge, metal part of the pots, jack plate, etc.) and the buzz stops, then it's fine. That's normal. Only GOOD humbuckers stop hum.
#10
Quote by Invader Jim
If you touch anything that's touching the grounds (strings, brigdge, metal part of the pots, jack plate, etc.) and the buzz stops, then it's fine. That's normal. Only GOOD humbuckers stop hum.


Are you sure? That would be my first indication there was a problem with grounding. Whether you are touching any of those parts or not, should not effect and buzz coming out of the amp.
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Peavey JSX
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#11
I have the exact same problem as the TS.

I've wired guitars before, and so far I never had these problems.
Anyways: I have a hum coming out of my guitar even with all pots closed. When I touch any object (strings, jack, humbuckers, etc.) attached to ground, the hum dissapears.

I figured I had a ground problem, so I took it apart, and redid the whole guitar with new cabeling, I made sure to check everything was attached to the ground, the problem stayed.

I replaced the jack, the volume and tone pots and the switch and I still have this hum. Even without the pickups attached I get this hum.

And now it gets weird: My other guitars don't hum AT ALL on the same cable / same amp.

What am I missing here?

(And for the record this is probably the 25th guitar I've wired, I just don't get it...seriously..)
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#12
Had a problem with this on my friend's guitar. Replaced the output jack, still didn't work. Then his guitar teacher fixed it and said that you should use lead-free solder because the output jack was corroded. Yeah right, corroded. Lead-free solder? Bull****.

OT: Grounding or output jack issue.
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#13
I already replaced the jack, and I'm using regular issue fine electronics solder with a resin core.

Weirdest thing is that I still get hum with the pots closed.

I think I'll do another full rewire with Fender Cloth cable. Right now I'm using your average single core with mantle cable. Perhaps going old-school will fix this...

Or does anyone have a suggestion?
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#14
No, putting Fender wire in it isn't going to fix anything.

Just check every single solder joint. Check every ground wire. Make sure grounds to pots are secure and the solder joints are shiny. If they look dull then they are cold joints, and need to be reheated until they cool shiny.

Check the entire wiring diagram against what you have. Inspect the switch to make sure its contacting like it should.

Something is hanging with an open circuit inducing the hum.
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#15
Hey, good point!

I think I remember seeing that the soldering on the push-pul pot I am using as a coil split looked dull, as in: not shiney.

I'll give it another go
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#16
Quote by sacamano79
Are you sure? That would be my first indication there was a problem with grounding. Whether you are touching any of those parts or not, should not effect and buzz coming out of the amp.

I'm 2000% sure. It affects the buzz b/c it's grounding to YOU.

Listen, people. I've rewired hundreds of guitars in my life and they ALL did this. I know exactly what I'm talking about, so you'll just have to take my word for it. Plus, think about it: the buzz stops when you touch the strings. You have to touch the strings/bridge to play.

I just got a Guitar World DVD lesson thingy and Andy Aledort's GIBSON Les Paul buzzed like a tree full of bees when he took his hand off the strings or bridge, just like TS's guitar, whatever it is (I forgot).
#17
PLEASE, listen to what jim is trying to say.

all guitars buzz to an extent, unless the player is running a noisegate with the threshhold level set very high, then it cuts volume before you get white noise.

TS, what to do:

1) get a good humbucker,potted well.
2)properly shield your guitar cavities...here is a link:

http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php

3)all grounds should lead to your ground wire coming from your bridge. make sure there are NO GROUND LOOPS! These are a #1 cause for hum.

4) your guitar will buzz, when you are not touching the strings/tuners/bridge/output jack/ any metal part on your guitar.

Right now, you said it only stops when you touch the output jack plate..that means that that piece is properly grounded (because it has a jack with a ground attached to it..duh) But this means, you do not have the grounds going towards your bridge, for you to attenuate the buzz, and also for you to act as a ground against EMI.

5) PROFIT!


now do it to it.
Quote by Invader Jim
The questions people ask here makes me wonder how the TS's dress themselves in the morning and can shower without drowning...
#20
Quote by Invader Jim
If you touch anything that's touching the grounds (strings, brigdge, metal part of the pots, jack plate, etc.) and the buzz stops, then it's fine. That's normal. Only GOOD humbuckers stop hum.



I have JB/Jazz in my guitar and it does that! But I put a bigsby on my guitar and the ground wire might not be connected. I can't get the solder to stick to the Bigsby.
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#21
Hmm... Ok il just leave it then. The only reason i was asking is because my old guitar has the cheapest humbuckers, really cheap components and the worst wiring ive ever seen. (Seriously its like someone did the soldering with a bomb and some aluminium foil ) and my new guitar has the neatest wiring, great pickups and decent components and it buzzes like ****
#22
Quote by walker-rose
I have JB/Jazz in my guitar and it does that! But I put a bigsby on my guitar and the ground wire might not be connected. I can't get the solder to stick to the Bigsby.

You don't solder to the bridge. You wrap the wire around a screw or something...
#23
I tried that and it still buzzed.
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