#1
I am going to be getting a warmoth neck for a custom body that I'm building (maybe I'll get around to a page for that, dunno if anyone cares)

I'm getting down to their small options, and I've never heard of Stainless steel frets, so what's the deal. do they look different at all?
Also, as far as radiuss, is a strat "compound radiused?" what is people's advice on this service, I just really want a gibson LP Custom feel, but I've never played a compound radiused neck, so is it worth it?

Thanks
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#2
A little darker in color but still relatively shiny and they are much much harder. Meaning, they are harder to wear down, not to mention since its SS it wont corrode like steel will.
#3
Ok, so they're still shiny like nickel frets though right?

And how about neck radiusss? I read Gibson has a standard 10 inch radius, but has anyone had experience with a compound radiused neck?
If Rock is a lifestyle, then Metal's an addiction

"People don't kill people with giant boulders"
"They will if you take away their assault rifles"

Quote by Gee-tar-eist
I wouldnt give a ****, i would gladly play music for people to steal it!
#4
Quote by strat212
Ok, so they're still shiny like nickel frets though right?

And how about neck radiusss? I read Gibson has a standard 10 inch radius, but has anyone had experience with a compound radiused neck?

Im sure they shine them up to look appealing, yes.

What about compound radiused necks? At about the 12th fret, the neck begins to flatten to make the bending of the strings not interfere with the other frets, eliminating any fret buzz that might occur. A lot necks are like this, and a lot aren't. They usually specify which are and aren't. My guitar is, and i can set the action lower and bend the strings higher because of it. Its all personal preference. Play it, if you like it, get it.
#5
i dont believe many if any les pauls have a compound radius but a few jacksons do you should probably go to your local store and try out some compound necks to see if you like them before ordering one
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#6
The gibson is usually a straight 12" radius. I have a warmoth neck with the compound radius. Its not like this huge difference that makes it hard to play. But you can get a lower action with the compound radius usually. But doesnt work so well with the fixed radius of TOM bridges. The TOM has the 12" radius so you cant flatten the radius like strat saddles. And some like stainless some dont. All my guitars have it. But Im really hard on standard fret wire. The stainless last for a really long time but is more expensive to get installed.
#7
Compound radius and stainless steel frets are a pain to service. The frets wear tools out really fast, so a lot of places will charge extra to work on them. The radius is impossible to perfectly reproduce, as well.

As far setting it up goes - In my experience, you can't beat a straight 12" radius for slammed-to-the-frets action.

Tuneomatic bridges have a fixed 12" radius 99% of the time. Do not buy a 9.5" radius Strat style neck for a TOM. Your action will be a mess.

And if you just want a Les Paul custom feel, go 12" with wide nickel frets.
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#8
Stainless steel frets don't have the same sustain as nickel.
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